Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:00
- 23:00
KAUST
The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners in the interdisciplinary field of biodevices, which spans across electronics, medicine, engineering, material sciences, and related areas.  The conference is a continuation of a series that started this year with the KAUST Research Conference on New Trends in Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
Thursday, November 07, 2019, 16:30
- 19:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5220
Modern industries are adapting smart ways of monitoring their processes to ensure smooth operations. Sensors capable of early detection of a problem are becoming the norm in industrial processes.  This is key to the development of the “Internet of Things” (IoT), in which billions of interconnected devices will work together to make smart decisions. Sensors that can detect and communicate the process information are essential ingredients of any IoT-enabled network. Since billions of such sensor nodes will be required in the future, the low cost will be an important feature for these devices. Consistent with the above-mentioned trends, the oil industry is also adapting smart monitoring and actuation mechanisms for its day-to-day operations.  This thesis is focused on developing low-cost sensors, which can increase oil production efficiency through real-time monitoring of oil wells and also help in the safe transport of oil products from the wells to the refineries.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Thursday, November 07, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday, November 04, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Chung-An Shen, Associate Professor, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology
Tuesday, October 22, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 2

Abstract

The 5th Generation (5G) wireless communication provides considerably enhanced user experiences and offers possibilitie

Monday, October 21, 2019, 14:30
- 15:30
B3 L5 Room 5220
Compact, autonomous computing systems with integrated transducers are imperative to deliver advances in healthcare, navigation, livestock monitoring, point of care diagnostics, remote sensing, internet-of-things applications, smart cities etc. Reflecting this need, there has been sustained growth in the market for transducers. Polymer based transducers, which meld highly desirable properties such as low cost, light weight, high manufacturability, biocompatibility and flexibility, are quite attractive. Doping polymers with magnetic materials results in the formation of magnetic composite polymers, enhancing the attractive traits of polymer transducers with magnetic properties. This dissertation is dedicated to the development of magnetic polymer transducers, which are suitable for energy harvesting and saline fluid transduction.
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Semiconductors are pervasive in consumer electronics and optoelectronics, and the related optical devices are deemed disruptive that Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014 was awarded to the inventors of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which “has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”. While AlInGaN-based lasers and LEDs, and silicon-based photodetectors are currently matured, unconventional usage based on the materials has demonstrated their further potential, including solar-hydrogen generation, indoor-horticulture, and high-speed communication.
Dr. Paul Anthony Haigh,Lecturer in Communications, Intelligent Sensing and Communications Group,Newcastle University
Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
B2 L5 Room 5220

Abstract

Visible light communications (VLC) is a hot topic in internet access networks, developing rapidly over the last decade

Thursday, September 12, 2019, 09:30
- 11:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
This thesis aims to investigate the microscopic characteristics of the nanowires and expand on the possibility of using transparent amorphous substrate for III-nitride nanowire devices. In this work, we performed material growth, characterization, and device fabrication of III-nitride nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy on unconventional substrates including silicon substrates and fused silica substrates. We also investigated the effect of various nucleation layers on the morphology and quality of the nanowires.
Sunday, September 08, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322
This talk provides an overview of the latest laser-based lighting and Gbit/s VLC and underwater communications. Recent progress of visible wavelength high-speed transmitters and receivers will also be discussed.
Christian Claudel, Assistant Professor, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at UT-Austin
Wednesday, September 04, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 5, Level 5, Room 5209

Abstract

Flash floods are one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, causing thousands of casualties every year.

Sunday, September 01, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
With the advent of wearable sensors and internet of things (IoT), there is a new focus on electronics which can be bent so that they can be worn or mounted on non-planar objects. Due to large volume (billions of devices), there is a requirement that the cost is extremely low, to the extent that they become disposable. The flexible and low-cost aspects can be addressed through additive manufacturing technologies such as inkjet, screen and 3D printing. This talk introduces additive manufacturing as an emerging technique to realize low cost, flexible and wearable wireless communication and sensing systems.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Wednesday, July 31, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.
Tuesday, July 30, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
Ultraviolet (UV) group III-Nitride-based light emitters have been used in various applications such as water purification, medicine, lighting and chemical detection. Despite attractive properties such as bandgap tunability in the whole UV range (UV-C to UV-A), high chemical stability and relative low cost, the low quantum efficiency hamper the full utilization. This thesis aims to show alternative solutions to such problems by employing nanowires (NWs) structures, and target the eventual application of reliable and high power NWs-based light-emitting devices, enabling large-scale production using the established silicon foundry processes. Here, we present the improvement of injection current and optical power of AlGaN NWs LEDs by involving a metal bilayer thin film with a dual purpose: eliminate the potential barrier for carrier transport, and inhibit the formation of silicide.