Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:00
- 23:00
KAUST
The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners in the interdisciplinary field of biodevices, which spans across electronics, medicine, engineering, material sciences, and related areas.  The conference is a continuation of a series that started this year with the KAUST Research Conference on New Trends in Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
Monday, November 18, 2019, 00:00
- 23:45
Auditorium 0215, between building 2 and 3
2019 Statistics and Data Science Workshop confirmed speakers include Prof. Alexander Aue, University of California Davis, USA, Prof. Francois Bachoc, University Toulouse 3, France, Prof. Rosa M. Crujeiras Casais, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Prof. Emanuele Giorgi, Lancaster University, UK, Prof. Jeremy Heng, ESSEC Asia-Pacific, Singapore, Prof. Birgir Hrafnkelsson, University of Iceland, Iceland, Prof. Ajay Jasra, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Emtiyaz Khan, RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project, Japan, Prof. Robert Krafty, University of Pittsburgh, USA, Prof. Guido Kuersteiner, University of Maryland, USA, Prof. Paula Moraga, University of Bath, UK, Prof. Tadeusz Patzek, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Brian Reich, North Carolina State University, USA, Prof. Dag Tjostheim, University Bergen, Norway, Prof. Xiangliang Zhang, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Sylvia Rose Esterby, University of British Colombia, Canada, Prof. Abdel El-Shaarawi, Retired Professor at the National Water Research Institute, Canada.
Thursday, November 07, 2019, 16:30
- 19:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5220
Modern industries are adapting smart ways of monitoring their processes to ensure smooth operations. Sensors capable of early detection of a problem are becoming the norm in industrial processes.  This is key to the development of the “Internet of Things” (IoT), in which billions of interconnected devices will work together to make smart decisions. Sensors that can detect and communicate the process information are essential ingredients of any IoT-enabled network. Since billions of such sensor nodes will be required in the future, the low cost will be an important feature for these devices. Consistent with the above-mentioned trends, the oil industry is also adapting smart monitoring and actuation mechanisms for its day-to-day operations.  This thesis is focused on developing low-cost sensors, which can increase oil production efficiency through real-time monitoring of oil wells and also help in the safe transport of oil products from the wells to the refineries.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Thursday, November 07, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Dr. Michel Dumontier, Distinguished Professor of Data Science at Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Monday, November 04, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will discuss our work to create computational standards, platforms, and methods to wrangle knowledge into simple, but effective representations based on semantic web technologies that are maximally FAIR - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reuseable - and to further use these for biomedical knowledge discovery. But only with additional crucial developments will this emerging Internet of FAIR data and services enable automated scientific discovery on a global scale.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday, November 04, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Pieter Barendrecht, PhD Student, Computer Science, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Thursday, October 24, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214

Abstract

There are many intriguing aspects and applications of splines, i

Chung-An Shen, Associate Professor, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology
Tuesday, October 22, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 2

Abstract

The 5th Generation (5G) wireless communication provides considerably enhanced user experiences and offers possibilitie

Dr. Sumayah Alrwais, Assistant Professor, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA
Monday, October 21, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, Sumayah will survey a number of malicious hosting infrastructures for different services and approaches to detecting them. Among them are works on an emerging trend of Bulletproof hosting services reselling infrastructure from lower-end service providers, use of residential proxy as a service to avoid server-side blocking and DNS based hosting infrastructure.
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Semiconductors are pervasive in consumer electronics and optoelectronics, and the related optical devices are deemed disruptive that Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014 was awarded to the inventors of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which “has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”. While AlInGaN-based lasers and LEDs, and silicon-based photodetectors are currently matured, unconventional usage based on the materials has demonstrated their further potential, including solar-hydrogen generation, indoor-horticulture, and high-speed communication.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223
This talk will try to clarify some misconceptions about what digital health (DH) is, and what it should not be.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325
Computing and communications infrastructures have become commodities that transact huge quantities of data and are pervasively interconnected, inside countries, and worldwide. Modern societies largely depend on them.
Monday, October 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Existing RDF engines are designed for specific hardware architectures; porting to a different architecture (e.g., GPUs) entails enormous implementation effort. We explore sparse matrix algebra as an alternative for designing a portable, scalable and efficient RDF engine.