Khaled Alshehri, Assistant Professor, KFUPM
Thursday, June 04, 2020, 13:00
- 14:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94745258090
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As end-consumers of electricity become more proactive and as many countries around the world push for a deeper penetration of renewable resources into the power grid, critical issues and challenges arise to the design and operation of deregulated electricity markets. In this presentation, we show how one can exploit tools from game theory to address some of these critical issues. Firstly, wholesale and retail markets are becoming more integrated due to the increasing adoption of distributed energy resources, creating a large gap in the current understanding of the impact of such small-scale energy resources on the larger power system operation and electricity market outcomes. This motivates us to develop a metric, called the Price of Aggregation, which quantifies the impact of integrating distributed energy resources in the retail-level on wholesale market efficiency.  Secondly, evidence from real markets indicate that large-scale adoption of wind energy in the transmission system leads to significantly higher price volatility in wholesale markets. To mitigate the effects of price volatility, we propose an add-on centralized clearing mechanism that is applicable to any wholesale market, with the aim of allowing any market participant to hedge against profit volatilities, without changing the existing market operations. Finally, we develop a multiperiod-multicompany demand response framework in retail markets, which captures the behavior of competing companies and their price-responsive end-consumers. Using real-life data, we demonstrate potential savings that can exceed 30% for end-consumers, in addition to revealing desirable mathematical properties and deep insights.
Sunday, April 26, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99946379374
This talk presents an overview of challenges, state-of the-art, and applications for distributed robotic systems. In distributed robotic systems, there is a group of robots that seek to achieve a collective task. Applications include environmental monitoring, search and rescue, and programmable self-assembly. Settings can range from a small team of cooperative robots to a swarm of many interacting agents. An essential feature of such systems is that individual robots make decisions based on available local information as well as limited communications with other robots. The challenge is to design local protocols that result in desired global outcomes. In contrast to a traditional centralized paradigm, both measurements and decisions are distributed among multiple actors.
Dr. Inmo Jang, Postdoctoral Researcher, Robotics for Extreme Environment Group at the University of Manchester
Thursday, February 27, 2020, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
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As autonomy in individual robots becomes advanced, one of the next challenges is to coordinate multiple of such intelligent robots, which are then expected to innovatively transform legacy industries (e.g., warehouse automation, connected-vehicle management, etc.). Towards collaboration of multiple robots, this talk will particularly introduce a game-theoretical framework for clustering a large number of multiple robots and assigning the robot teams to given tasks, where the network of the robots is strongly connected and the individuals are asynchronous. The proposed decentralised algorithm guarantees convergence of selfish agents having social inhibition towards a Nash stable partition (i.e., social agreement) within polynomial time.
Fatma Abdelhedi, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering department, at the College of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University
Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
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Robotics is set to play an ever increasingly important role in society, due to its influence in every aspect of life, including medicine and healthcare, manufacturing, services..etc
Mohammed Kutbi, Assistant Professor at the department of Computer Science and a member of the Artificial Intelligence Unit at Saudi Electronic University (SEU)
Thursday, January 30, 2020, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
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The emerging need to improve the quality of life for elderly and disabled individuals who rely on wheelchairs for mobility is our motivation for this work. Research on robotics wheelchair covers broad range from motion control, how to control the wheelchair movement, to complete autonomy.
Christian Claudel, Assistant Professor, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at UT-Austin
Wednesday, September 04, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 5, Level 5, Room 5209
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Flash floods are one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, causing thousands of casualties every year. The emergence of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) gives the possibility to monitor these events over large geographical areas. In this talk, we focus on the problem of trajectory planning for a swarm of unmanned aerial vehicles sensing flooding conditions.
Georgios Piliouras, Assistant Professor, Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD)
Monday, April 29, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B1 L3 RM 3119
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We study a simple learning dynamic model of routing (congestion) games to explore the effects of increasing the total demand on system performance. We focus on the most benign setting, non-atomic routing games with two parallel edges of linear cost, where all agents evolve using Multiplicative Weights Updates with a fixed learning rate.
Dr. Shinkyu Park, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Sunday, March 17, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Lecture Hall 1 Room 2322
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The first part of the talk will present my research on designing an animal-borne remote imaging system and developing theory and algorithm for distributed sensor fusion that enables estimation and detection of animal group movements using the system.
Julian Barreiro-Gomez, (New York University in Abu Dhabi )
Monday, November 05, 2018, 11:00
- 12:00
B1 L3 RM 3119
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Game theory has become a powerful tool in engineering field to study, model and control interacting systems. This talk addresses two game theoretical approaches, i.e., evolutionary games and mean-field-type games.