I visited KAUST for the first time in 2011. Part of the visit was to visit a small museum of science in the early days of Islam. I understood immediately that the historical context of this university is a project of immense importance and the historical dimension was not lost on me. Coming out of that little museum, I told myself “this is the place I want to be”.
Mootaz Elnozahy CEMSE Dean

Courses

Professor Elnozahy's courses

Education Profile

  • ​​​​Ph.D., Computer Science, Rice University, 1993
  • M.S., Computer Science, Rice University, 1990
  • M.S., Computer Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt, 1987
  • B.S., Electrical Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt, 1984​

Honors & Awards

  • Elected Member, IFIP 10.4 Working Group, 2013. Chair starting 2019.
  • IEEE Fellow, January 2010.
  • Best Paper Award, 2nd  International Green Computing Conference, 2011.
  • Best Paper Award, 8th  IEEE International Conference on Network Protocols, 2005
  • Trailblazer Award, University of Texas at Austin, October 2003.
  • National Science Foundation CAREER award, June 1995.
  • Various IBM awards including:
    • Outstanding Technical Achievement Award, IBM, PERCS Phase 3 win, Jan 2008.
    • Technical Group Award, IBM, March 2006, PERCS Phase 2 execution.
    • System and Technology Group “Master Inventor,” IBM, September 2005.
    • President Award, IBM, PERCS Phase 2 win, August 2003.
    • Outstanding Invention Award, for innovative solutions in the Bureau of Census project, May 2002.
    • Research Division Technical Group Award, IBM Research, 2000.
    • Team Award” for efforts in prototyping a Cache Coherent Non Uniform Memory Access Multiprocessor based on the Intel architecture, December 1999.
    • Research Division Award, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, October 1992, for contributions to the Highly Available Network File Server project (HANFS).
  • The Ralph Budd Award for the best Ph.D. thesis in engineering, Rice University, June 1994.

Editorial Membership

Professor Elnozahy served on over 35 technical program committees for leading conferences in the computing systems area and as Associate Editor of:

  • IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems
  • IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Systems.

Location

E.N. (Mootaz) Elnozahy is currently the Dean of the Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical ScienceS and Engineering at KAUST. Prior to arriving at KAUST, Mootaz spent 15 years at IBM Research. He started his career as an Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University in 1993. His research interests are generally in systems, with specific interests in computer system architecture, operating systems, distributed systems, reliable computing, and high performance computer systems. His early work contributed to a defining paper about rollback-recovery in distributed systems. He also built the first low-power server in 2000 at IBM. He led IBM’s participation in the DARPA’s HPCS program, which culminated in 2012 with a machine that outperformed system level benchmarks by three orders of magnitude. 

Education and early career

Dr. Elnozahy has a Ph.D. in computer science from Rice University in 1994, and a B.Sc. in electrical engineering from Cairo University in 1993. His name appears as an inventor on 57 U.S. patents. In addition to the positions he held at CMU and IBM, he was also an adjunct professor at the University of Texas from 1998 to 2012, and a visiting researcher at Bellcore and Bell Labs in the middle of the 1990’s. 

Career recognitions

He received various awards, including elevation to IEEE Fellow in 2010, and the Trail Blazer award from the University of Texas in 2003. He also received various awards at IBM, including named a Master Inventor.

Editorial activities

In the past, Professor Elnozahy served as Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, and Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Systems. He served on over 35 technical program committees for leading conferences in the computing systems area. 

Why computer science?

My love with computers started when my father bought me a programmable calculator in 1980. I was blown away by the ability to tell the computer to do what I tell it to do. Programming became an instant hobby. Then, I started using it to automate some of the transmission line and electrical motor computations in my electrical engineering classes, and I discovered that programmers have limitless horizons in terms of the impact that they create. It has been a life-long passion.

Why KAUST?

I visited KAUST in 2011 to interview for the dean position at the request of the then provost Professor Stefan Catsicas. Part of the visit was to visit a small museum of science in the early days of Islam. In the museum, the vision of the university founder was displayed prominently. Reading the vision, and being from this region, I felt that the king was talking to me directly. I understood immediately that the historical context of this university is a project of immense importance and the historical dimension was not lost on me. Coming out of that little museum, I told myself “this is the place I want to be”.