Thursday, April 15, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94262797011?pwd=ZXBBcnltQ3JvZkdhWFZjTEptL3FmUT09
Contact Person

Abstract

Dynamic programming is an efficient technique to solve optimization problems.

Olivier Guéant, Professor, Applied Mathematics at Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France
Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 15:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97831248001
Contact Person
This 6-hour course covers the theory of optimal control in the case of discrete spaces / graphs. In the first part, we present the dynamic programming principle and the resulting Bellman equations. Bellman equations, which turn out to be a system of backward ordinary differential equations (ODE), are then thoroughly studied: in addition to existence and uniqueness results obtained through classical ODE tools and comparison principles, the long-term behavior of optimal control problems is studied using comparison principles and semi-group tools. The second part of the course focuses on a special case of optimal control problems on graphs for which closed-form solutions can be derived. The link with inventory management problems will be presented in details (in particular the link with the resolution of the Avellaneda-Stoikov problem, a classical problem in finance).
Olivier Guéant, Professor, Applied Mathematics at Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, France
Tuesday, April 06, 2021, 15:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/93184598804
Contact Person
This 6-hour course covers the theory of optimal control in the case of discrete spaces / graphs. In the first part, we present the dynamic programming principle and the resulting Bellman equations. Bellman equations, which turn out to be a system of backward ordinary differential equations (ODE), are then thoroughly studied: in addition to existence and uniqueness results obtained through classical ODE tools and comparison principles, the long-term behavior of optimal control problems is studied using comparison principles and semi-group tools. The second part of the course focuses on a special case of optimal control problems on graphs for which closed-form solutions can be derived. The link with inventory management problems will be presented in details (in particular the link with the resolution of the Avellaneda-Stoikov problem, a classical problem in finance).
Mathieu Laurière, Postdoc, Operations Research and Financial Engineering, Princeton University, USA
Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 14:30
- 17:30
https://kaust.zoomus/j/91484640398
Contact Person
Mean field games and mean field control problems are frameworks to study Nash equilibria or social optima in games with a continuum of agents. These problems can be used to approximate competitive or cooperative situations with a large finite number of agents, and have found a broad range of applications, from economics to crowd motion, energy production and risk management. The solutions are typically characterized by a forward-backward system of partial differential equations (PDE) or stochastic differential equations (SDE).
Speakers from KAUST, CEMSE, PSE, G-CSC, IBRAE, and NM RAS
Thursday, March 25, 2021, 10:30
- 17:00
Zoom invite is sent to registered users by email before the meeting.
Contact Person

Registration

To register, please send an email to dmitry.logashenko@kaust.edu.sa. The workshop will use Zoom. The link will be distributed to registered users by email before the meeting.

Abstract

This workshop is devoted to the numerical simulation of the groundwater flow and subsurface contamination transport, as well as related problems. The main topics are the mathematical modeling of the processes in the porous media and the numerical methods for discretization, solution of the discretized systems and numerical treatment of inverse problems. In particular, fractured porous media and partially saturated aquifers will be concerned.

Mathieu Laurière, Postdoc, Operations Research and Financial Engineering, Princeton University, USA
Tuesday, March 23, 2021, 14:30
- 17:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98430292725
Contact Person
Mean field games and mean field control problems are frameworks to study Nash equilibria or social optima in games with a continuum of agents. These problems can be used to approximate competitive or cooperative situations with a large finite number of agents, and have found a broad range of applications, from economics to crowd motion, energy production and risk management. The solutions are typically characterized by a forward-backward system of partial differential equations (PDE) or stochastic differential equations (SDE)
Ewelina Zatorska, Senior Lecturer, Applied and Numerical Analysis, Imperial College London, UK
Thursday, March 18, 2021, 14:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94549347967
Contact Person
In this lecture I will present broader spectrum of complex, multicomponent flows. For example, the models of compressible mixtures describe multicomponent fluids that are mixed on the molecular level. They are different from the models of the multi-phase flows from the first lecture, because there is no division of volume occupied by different species. The existence of global in time weak solutions, and global in time strong solutions for such systems will be explained, and some open problems related to singular limits and weak-strong uniqueness of solutions will be mentioned. At the end of the lecture I will also present another model of two-phase flow describing the motion of compressible and incompressible medium with an interphase given by a condition on the density. I will explain how to prove the existence of solutions and give some applications in modelling of crowd evacuation.
Martino Bardi, Professor, Mathematical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy
Wednesday, March 17, 2021, 15:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98147555364
Contact Person
I will start recalling the definitions and basic properties of viscosity solutions to fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations, in particular the comparison principles. The main goal of the course is discussing two properties of subsolutions: the Strong Maximum Principle (SMP), i.e., if a subsolution in an open connected set attains an interior maximum then it is constant, and the Liouville property, i.e., if a subsolution in the whole space is bounded form above then it is constant. They are standard results for classical solutions of linear elliptic PDEs, and many extensions are known, especially for divergence form equations. My goal is explaining how the viscosity methods allow to turn around the difficulties of non-smooth solutions, fully nonlinear equations, and their possible degeneracies.
Thursday, March 11, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94262797011?pwd=ZXBBcnltQ3JvZkdhWFZjTEptL3FmUT09
Contact Person
Small-scale cut and fold patterns imposed on sheet material enable its morphing into three-dimensional shapes. This manufacturing paradigm has received much attention in recent years and poses challenges in both fabrication and computation. It is intimately connected with the interpretation of patterned sheets as mechanical metamaterials, typically of negative Poisson ratio. We discuss a fundamental geometric question, namely the targeted programming of a shape morph from a flat sheet to a curved surface, or even between any two shapes. The solution draws on differential geometry, discrete differential geometry, geometry processing and geometric optimization.
Martino Bardi, Professor, Mathematical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy
Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 15:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97385719868
Contact Person
I will start recalling the definitions and basic properties of viscosity solutions to fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations, in particular the comparison principles. The main goal of the course is discussing two properties of subsolutions: the Strong Maximum Principle (SMP), i.e., if a subsolution in an open connected set attains an interior maximum then it is constant, and the Liouville property, i.e., if a subsolution in the whole space is bounded form above then it is constant. They are standard results for classical solutions of linear elliptic PDEs, and many extensions are known, especially for divergence form equations. My goal is explaining how the viscosity methods allow to turn around the difficulties of non-smooth solutions, fully nonlinear equations, and their possible degeneracies.
Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 12:00
- 14:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/93212598025
Contact Person
The objective of this work is to develop a near-infrared laser device capable of emitting orbital angular momentum (OAM) light. The prototyped device must be suitable for compact, energy-saving optical communication applications. Integrated OAM lasers would revolutionize high capacity data transmission over any telecommunication network environment as OAM light can be guided and transmitted through kilometers of optical fibers as well as propagated in free space and underwater.
Dr. Ewelina Zatorska, Senior Lecturer in the Applied and Numerical Analysis, Imperial College London
Tuesday, March 09, 2021, 15:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92756762717
Contact Person
In this talk, I will present the recent developments in the topic of the existence of solutions to the two-fluid systems. The compensated compactness technique of P.-L. Lions and E. Feireisl for single-component fluids has certain limitations, distinctly in the context of multi-component flow models. A particular example of such a model is the two-fluids Stokes system with a single velocity field and two densities, and with an algebraic pressure law closure. The first result that I will present is the existence of weak solutions for such a system, using the compactness criterion introduced recently by D. Bresch and P.-E. Jabin. I will also outline an innovative construction of solutions relying on the G. Crippa and C. DeLellis stability estimates for the transport equation. In the last part of my talk, I will relate to a couple of more recent results: the existence of solutions to the one-dimensional system, non-uniqueness of solutions to the inviscid system, and I will comment on issues around weak-strong uniqueness.
Martino Bardi, Professor, Mathematical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy
Monday, March 08, 2021, 15:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92420134266
Contact Person
I will start recalling the definitions and basic properties of viscosity solutions to fully nonlinear degenerate elliptic equations, in particular the comparison principles. The main goal of the course is discussing two properties of subsolutions: the Strong Maximum Principle (SMP), i.e., if a subsolution in an open connected set attains an interior maximum then it is constant, and the Liouville property, i.e., if a subsolution in the whole space is bounded form above then it is constant. They are standard results for classical solutions of linear elliptic PDEs, and many extensions are known, especially for divergence form equations. My goal is explaining how the viscosity methods allow to turn around the difficulties of non-smooth solutions, fully nonlinear equations, and their possible degeneracies.
Monday, March 08, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98889531668
Contact Person
We present a novel large-scale dataset and accompanying machine learning models aimed at providing a detailed understanding of the interplay between visual content, its emotional effect, and explanations for the latter in language. In contrast to most existing annotation datasets in computer vision, we focus on the affective experience triggered by visual artworks and ask the annotators to indicate the dominant emotion they feel for a given image and, crucially, to also provide a grounded verbal explanation for their emotion choice.
Derya Baran, Assistant Professor, Material Science and Engineering, PSE, KAUST
Sunday, March 07, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97706323720
Contact Person
The need for big data that the internet of things (IoT) has created in recent years has turned the focus on integrating the human body in the quest to understand it better, and in turn use such information for detection and prevention of harmful conditions. Applications in which continuous and uninterrupted operation is required, or where the use of external power sources may be challenging demands the use of self-powered autonomous systems. Organic photovoltaic devices are flexible, lightweight, and soft, capable of interacting with the human body and its mechanical demands. Their processability from solutions permits their adaptation to versatile fabrication techniques such as spin coating, roll-to-roll coating and inkjet printing, with benefits including low material usage and freedom of design. In this talk, I will present how organic photovoltaics can be utilized in printed electronics as energy harvesting devices and go through the historical progress of organic/hybrid photovoltaics as well as the main activities that are ongoing in my research lab ‘Omegalab’.
Prof. José Miguel Urbano, Mathematics at the University of Coimbra (Portugal)
Thursday, March 04, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94262797011?pwd=ZXBBcnltQ3JvZkdhWFZjTEptL3FmUT09
Contact Person

Abstract

We establish a new oscillation estimate for solutions of nonlinear partial differential e

Aram Karakhanyan, Professor, School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh, UK
Tuesday, March 02, 2021, 15:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91736661597
Contact Person
In this course I will discuss the basics of the classical theory of free boundary problems. We will focus on two problems; the Alt-Caffarelli and obstacle problem. In the first part of the course we will discuss the regularity of the solutions, and in the remainder the full and partial regularity of the free boundary
Monday, March 01, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98889531668
Contact Person
In this talk, I will introduce our recent efforts on developing novel computational models in the field of biological imaging. I will start with the examples in electron tomography, for which I will introduce a robust and efficient scheme for fiducial marker tracking, and then describe a novel constrained reconstruction model towards higher resolution sub-tomogram averaging. I will then show our work on developing deep learning methods for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.
Xiaohang Li, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Sunday, February 28, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97706323720
Contact Person
Wide bandgap (WBG) compound semiconductors including GaN have shown enormous success in solid-state lighting, display, and electrification in recent decades due to superior properties such as direct bandgap, high electron mobility, and large breakdown field. They have been changing the world by elevating living standards and addressing grand challenges such as global warming. The pioneering researchers have been recognized by numerous accolades including the Nobel Prize and most recently, the Queen Elizabeth Prize. Lately, the III-nitride and III-oxide ultrawide bandgap (UWBG) compound semiconductors with bandgap larger than 3.4 eV have attracted increasing attentions: they have been regarded as the 4th wave/generation after the consequential Si, III-V, and WBG semiconductors. Because the UWBG along with other properties could enable electronics and photonics to operate with significantly greater power and frequency capability and at much shorter far−deep UV wavelengths, respectively, both crucial for human society. Besides, they could be employed for the revolutionary quantum information science as the host and photonic platform. However, extensive multi-disciplinary studies of growth, materials, physics, and devices are essential to unearth the potentials due to the infancy. This seminar would cover the latest research on those aspects. It includes growth of state-of-the-art materials, discovery of unique material properties, and development of a widely adopted device physics framework for photonics and electronics especially short and long wavelength photonic devices.
Thursday, February 25, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94262797011?pwd=ZXBBcnltQ3JvZkdhWFZjTEptL3FmUT09
Contact Person

Abstract

The outstanding performance of deep neural networks (DNNs), for visual recognition tasks

Aram Karakhanyan, Professor, School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh, UK
Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 15:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92984769007
Contact Person
In this course I will discuss the basics of the classical theory of free boundary problems. We will focus on two problems; the Alt-Caffarelli and obstacle problem. In the first part of the course we will discuss the regularity of the solutions, and in the remainder the full and partial regularity of the free boundary.
Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 15:00
- 16:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/s/99564603569
Contact Person
"A picture is worth a thousand words", and by going beyond static images, interactive visualization has become crucial to exploring, analyzing, and understanding large-scale scientific data. This is true for many areas of science and engineering, such as high-resolution imaging in neuroscience or materials science, as well as in large-scale fluid simulations of the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans, or of trillion-cell oil reservoirs. However, the fact that the amount of data in data-driven sciences is increasing rapidly toward the petascale, and further, presents a tremendous challenge to interactive visualization and analysis. Nowadays, an important enabler of interactivity is often the parallel processing power of GPUs, which, however, requires well-designed customized data structures and algorithms. Furthermore, scientific data sets do not only get larger, they also get more and more complex, and thus have become very hard to interpret and analyze. In this talk, I will give an overview of the research of my group in large-scale scientific visualization, from data structures and algorithms that enable petascale visualization on GPUs, to novel visual abstractions for interactive analysis of highly complex structures in neuroscience, to novel mathematical techniques that leverage differential geometric methods for the detection and visualization of features in large, complex fluid dynamics data on curved surfaces such as the Earth.
Manuela Waldner, Assistant Professor at the Research Unit of Computer Graphics of the Institute of Visual Computing and Human-Centered Technology at TU Wien, Austria
Monday, February 22, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98889531668
Contact Person
Drawing the user's attention to important items in an image, a complex visualization, or a cluttered graphical user interface is a non-trivial challenge. In the context of visualization, our goal is to effectively attract the user's attention to relevant items in large and complex scenes, while keeping noticeable modifications of the image to a minimum. In this talk, I will give an overview of common highlighting methods and present results from my research on attention guidance in complex, dynamic visualizations.