Tuesday, November 09, 2021, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97915131876
Contact Person
The limited overcrowded radio frequency spectrum compelled researchers to explore higher frequency ranges for wireless transmission such as optical frequency bands. In recent decades, visible light communications (VLC) have gained lots of research attention thanks to the abundant bandwidth they offer and the existing lighting infrastructure they utilize that consequently reduces deployment costs.
Monday, November 08, 2021, 16:00
- 19:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5220
Contact Person
Constructing functional representations of the key quantities of interest (QoIs), the ignition delay time (ign), of an uncertain ignition reaction in high dimension is our main goal. First, attention is focused on the ignition delay time of an iso-octane air mixture, using a detailed chemical mechanism with 3,811 elementary reactions. Uncertainty in all reaction rates is directly accounted for using associated uncertainty factors, assuming independent log uniform priors. A Latin hypercube sample (LHS) of the ignition delay times was first generated, and the resulting database was then exploited to assess the possibility of constructing polynomial chaos (PC) representations in terms of the canonical random variables parameterizing the uncertain rates.
Professor Dan Crisan, Mathematics, Imperial College London
Wednesday, November 03, 2021, 15:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98631176164
Contact Person
Fluid dynamics models are ubiquitous in a multitude of applications. One of the most important applications of fluid dynamics models is numerical weather prediction. Modern numerical weather prediction combines sophisticated nonlinear fluid dynamics models with increasingly accurate high-dimensional data.  This process is called data assimilation and it is performed every day at all major operational weather centers across the world. Data assimilation  (DA) requires massive computing capabilities as realistic atmosphere-ocean models typically have billions of degrees of freedom. I will give a short overview of the ongoing research that aims to drastically decrease the required DA computational effort by reducing the dimension of the models involved and using stochastic perturbations to account for the unresolved scales. The incorporation of observation data is done by using particle approximations suitably adapted to solve high-dimensional problems.
Tuesday, November 02, 2021, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91954695269
Contact Person
Human knowledge can facilitate the evolution of artificial intelligence towards learning the capability of planning and reasoning and has been the critical element for developing the next-generation artificial intelligence. Although knowledge collection and organization have achieved significant progress, it is still non-trivial to construct a comprehensive knowledge graph for downstream applications. The difficulty motivates the study of knowledge association to resolve the problem, yet current solutions suffer from two primary shortages, i.e., generalization and robustness. Specifically, most existing methods require a sufficient number of labeled data and ignore the effective utilization of complex relationships between entities, limiting the generalization ability of knowledge association approaches. Moreover, prevailing approaches severely rely on clean labeled data, making the model vulnerable to noises in the given labeled data. These shortages motivate the research on generalization and robustness of knowledge association in this dissertation. 
Monday, November 01, 2021, 15:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97915131876
Contact Person
Partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to describe multi-dimensional physical phenomena. However, some of these phenomena are described by a more general class of systems called fractional systems (FS). 
Giovanni Russo,Full Professor,Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Catania, Italy
Monday, November 01, 2021, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
Semi-implicit schemes for evolutionary partial differential equations. Topic 3 - construction of more general schemes for evolutionary partial differential equations, in which the stiffness may be of a different type than the one previously considered. Several examples will be given illustrating the general procedure.
Sunday, October 31, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97114085704
Contact Person
Robot navigation typically comprises of decision making at two different levels - global planning to compute a viable trajectory to the robot's destination and strategic (local) interaction to elicit cooperation and resolve any conflicts with other robots/pedestrians that would arise while navigating along the trajectory. Robot navigation in crowded environments is particularly challenging as the robot needs to exhibit navigation behaviors that are conceived as socially compliant by human pedestrians or vehicles they maneuver at both of the levels. In this presentation, I will introduce some of relevant works from my research group.
Thursday, October 28, 2021, 16:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/8426647959
Contact Person
Optical wireless communication, taking advantage of the unlicensed ultraviolet-to-visible wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum, had been coined as the next-generation wireless communication technology and holds promises to deliver a boundless, high-speed, reliable and secured broadband experience.
Thursday, October 28, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99005716923
Contact Person
The qualitative study of PDEs often relies on integral identities and inequalities. For example, for time-dependent  PDEs, conserved integral quantities or quantities that are dissipated play an important role. In particular, if these integral quantities have a definite sign, they are of great interest as they may provide control on the solutions to establish well-posedness.
Giovanni Russo,Full Professor,Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Catania, Italy
Thursday, October 28, 2021, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
Implicit-Explicit schemes for hyperbolic systems with stiff relaxation. Topic 2 - hyperbolic relaxation models and to the methods for their numerical solution. After introduction of hyperbolic-hyperbolic and hyperbolic-parabolic type relaxation problem, conservative finite difference space discretization will be introduced.
Giovanni Russo, Professor, Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Catania, Italy
Wednesday, October 27, 2021, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
Construction of high order finite volume and finite difference shock-capturing schemes for conservation laws. Topic 1 - illustrating how to construct shock capturing schemes for conservation laws. We focus on semi-discrete schemes based on the method of lines.
Martin Whitaker, CEO Formula 1, Saudi Arabian Grand Prix
Tuesday, October 26, 2021, 15:00
- 16:30
Between buildings 4 and 5, Auditorium 0215
Contact Person
This presentation is about the race and the F1 Championship. The role that the race plays in the 2030 Vision and the global awareness platform that it creates for Saudi Arabia, the culture of the Kingdom, the community values for Jeddah and the legacy that it will leave. In addition the presentation will focus on the race as a platform for changing perceptions and how the race presents a chance to showcase sustainability and youth engagement. The opportunity for students to become involved in the race will be demonstrated.
Mathis Bode, Researcher, Institute for Combustion Technology (ITV) at RWTH Aachen University
Tuesday, October 26, 2021, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
The numerical solution of multi-physics problems relying on the Navier-Stokes equations has kept multiple generations of supercomputers busy. For fundamental problems, computational fluid dynamic aims to resolve all relevant time and length scales, which is then known as direct numerical simulation (DNS).
Monday, October 25, 2021, 14:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91395074375
Contact Person
During my Ph.D. program, we have studied mean-field games (MFGs). MFGs model games with large populations of rational agents. The agents search for their optimal strategies and trajectories to minimize an individual cost, which depends on the statistical distribution of the population. Although it is quite hard to consider the systems of large populations in the numerical analysis, we can expect to consider the average effect given by the populations because the influence of each agent should be small.
Monday, October 25, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
Contact Person
The human race is facing what may turn out to be an existential threat due to entrenched practices that are contributing to climate change. This talk addresses the impact of information technology (IT) in this regard.
José Miguel Urbano, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Coimbra, Portugal
Sunday, October 24, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325; https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92111901566
Contact Person
Singular and degenerate partial differential equations are unavoidable in the modelling of several phenomena, from phase transitions to flows in porous media or chemotaxis. They encompass a crucial issue in the analysis of pdes, namely wether we can still derive analytical estimates when the crucial algebraic assumption of ellipticity collapses.
Sunday, October 24, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97114085704
Contact Person
We live in the age of information where electronics play a critical role in our daily life. Moore’s Law: performance over cost has inspired innovation in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and enabled high performance, ultra-scaled CMOS electronics.
Thursday, October 21, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99005716923
Contact Person
The overarching goal of Prof. Michels' Computational Sciences Group within KAUST's Visual Computing Center is enabling accurate and efficient simulations for applications in Scientific and Visual Computing. Towards this goal, the group develops new principled computational methods based on solid theoretical foundations.
Prof. John Kornak, Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco
Thursday, October 14, 2021, 16:30
- 17:45
Auditorium, between buildings 4&5
Contact Person
Thursday, October 14, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99005716923
Contact Person
Assessing the effectiveness of cancer treatments in clinical trials raises multiple methodological challenges that need to be properly addressed in order to produce a reliable estimate of treatment effects.
Nikolas Kantas, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London
Wednesday, October 13, 2021, 15:30
- 16:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99846903910
Contact Person
We consider the problem of parameter estimation for a McKean stochastic differential equation, and the associated system of weakly interacting particles. The problem is motivated by many applications in areas such as neuroscience, social sciences (opinion dynamics, cooperative behaviours), financial mathematics, statistical physics. We will first survey some model properties related to propagation of chaos and ergodicity and then move on to discuss the problem of parameter estimation both in offline and on-line settings. In the on-line case, we propose an online estimator, which evolves according to a continuous-time stochastic gradient descent algorithm on the asymptotic log-likelihood of the interacting particle system. The talk will present our convergence results and then show some numerical results for two examples, a linear mean field model and a stochastic opinion dynamics model. This is joint work with Louis Sharrock, Panos Parpas and Greg Pavliotis. Preprint: https://arxiv.org/abs/2106.13751
Jinchao Xu, Affiliate Professor of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State University
Wednesday, October 13, 2021, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 9, level 2, Room # 2322
Contact Person
I will give a self-contained introduction to the theory of the neural network function class and its application to image classification and numerical solution of partial differential equations.
Jinchao Xu, Affiliate Professor of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State University
Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 09:00
- 10:00
BW BUILDING 4 AND 5 Level: 0 Room: AUDITORIUM 0215
Contact Person
I will give a self-contained introduction to the theory of the neural network function class and its application to image classification and numerical solution of partial differential equations.
Monday, October 11, 2021, 17:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/97634490362
Contact Person
Hardware impairments (HWIs) impose a huge challenge on modern wireless communication systems owing to the characteristics like compactness, least complexity, cost effectiveness and high energy efficiency. Numerous techniques are implemented to minimize the detrimental effects of these HWIs ,however, the residual HWIs may still appear as an additive distortion, multiplicative interference, or an aggregate of both. Numerous studies have commenced efforts to model one or the other forms of hardware impairments in the radio frequency (RF) transceivers. Many presented the widely linear model for in-phase and quadrature imbalance (IQI) but failed to recognize the impropriety induced in the system because of the self-interfering signals. Therefore, we have presented not only a rigorous aggregate impairment model along with its complete impropriety statistical characterization but also the appropriate performance analysis to quantify their degradation effects. Latest advances have endorsed the superiority of incorporating more generalized impropriety phenomenon as opposed to conventional propriety.
Jenny Xiaoe Li, Associate Professor, Economics and Mathematics, Penn State University, Pennsylvania
Monday, October 11, 2021, 14:00
- 15:00
Between buildings 4 and 5, Auditorium 0215
Contact Person
This talk is devoted to the study of a monetary model proposed by Rotemberg (Journal of Political Economy, 1984). Rotemberg’s model provided a general dynamic structure for investigating government intervention in the open market operation and it has inspired the development of many other models in related fields. This talk concerns a very basic theoretical question on the model, namely the existence and the uniqueness of the equilibrium, which has been an open problem since the publication of Rotemberg’s original paper. This question was partially addressed by Rotemberg by analyzing the linearization of the equation which governs the equilibrium and obtaining a numerical solution around the steady state equilibrium.