Tatsushi Hamaguchi, Electronic Engineering, Sony Corporation
Sunday, February 19, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Visible VCSELs have been attracting researchers’ interest for potential applications as light sources for optical storage, laser printers, projectors, displays, solid-state lighting, optical communications, biosensors, and so on.
Wednesday, February 15, 2023, 14:30
- 16:30
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Contact Person
In this dissertation, three different coupled systems of volume integral and hydrodynamic equations are formulated to analyze electromagnetic scattering from composite plasmonic structures consisting of dielectrics, metals, or semiconductors.
Tuesday, February 14, 2023, 16:00
- 18:00
Building 4, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
Leveraging on the unique solar light absorption behavior, chemical stability, and piezoelectric properties, nanostructured group-III-nitrides were utilized for implementing various renewable energy harvesting and conversion applications. By using different dimensional nanostructures, especially nanowires, and nanoporous membranes, this dissertation explored the practical applications in photocatalytic nitrogen reduction reaction, photocatalytic wastewater remediation, and flexible self-powered piezoelectric sensing.
Prof. Dr. Andreas Meister, Adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Maryland
Tuesday, February 14, 2023, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Contact Person
We will present a comprehensive study of a finite volume method for inviscid and viscous flow fields at high and low speeds. Thereby, the results of a formal asymptotic low Mach number analysis are used to extend the validity of the numerical method from the simulation of compressible flow fields at transonic as well as supersonic speed to the low Mach number regime.
Thomas Izgin, M.Sc., Department of Mathematics, University of Kassel
Tuesday, February 14, 2023, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3229
Contact Person
We present order conditions for various Patankar-type schemes as well as a new stability approach that examines the non-hyperbolic fixed points of the schemes for a general linear test problem. We formulate sufficient conditions for the stability of such non-hyperbolic fixed points and the local convergence of the numerical approximation towards the correct steady-state solution of the underlying test problem. To illustrate the theoretical results, we consider several members of the modified Patankar-type family within numerical experiments.
Prof Li Cheng, Chair Professor and Director, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Monday, February 13, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3128
Contact Person
As one of the founding departments in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) eighty-five years ago, the Department of Mechanical Engineering (ME) has been actively involved in both fundamental and applied research to advance the frontier of knowledge to serve Hong Kong, its surrounding region and beyond. The research foci of the department are in four major areas under three Research Centres and a Research Consortium under the University Niche Area scheme.
Prof.Bülent Erbilgin and Dr.Lama Hakem, KAUST Entrepreneurship Center
Monday, February 13, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325, Hall 2
Contact Person
Entrepreneurs continue to be the driver for economic development and innovation. Some startups invent brand new markets while other manage to enter markets crowded by existing large companies. In this seminar we will explore making critical early decisions starting from chaos and creating an exciting new business. We will gain insights on the value of learning by doing, prototyping, discussing tradeoffs between analysis, experimentation and scale.  We will also review courses offered by KAUST Entrepreneurship Center.
Prof. Mohamed El Machkouri, Associate professor, Applied Mathematics, University of Rouen Normandy
Sunday, February 12, 2023, 16:00
- 17:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
In this talk, we present theoretical asymptotic results for the nonparametric estimation of the conditional density of a scalar response variable Y given the explanatory X taking values in a finite-dimensional space when the sample of observations is considered as a sequence of dependent random variables.
Michail Maniatakos, Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York University (NYU), Abu Dhabi
Sunday, February 12, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Recent years have been pivotal in the field of Industrial Control Systems (ICS) security, with a large number of high-profile attacks exposing the lack of a design-for-security initiative in ICS.
Jian Weng, PhD student, Computer Science Department, UCLA
Sunday, February 12, 2023, 08:30
- 09:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94988389944
Contact Person
In this talk, I will first discuss how my research democratizes the accelerator designs and unifies the hardware/software innovations by automating the accelerator design process under a unified programming paradigm. By taking advantage of the compiler’s awareness of the program behaviors that profit from hardware specialization, accelerators can be automatically synthesized by searching through a well-defined design space. These automatically designed accelerators achieve comparable cost/performance efficiency compared with prior handcrafted designs. In the rest of the talk, I will also cover how this work inspires me to develop techniques to accelerate emerging application domains by orders-of-magnitude speedup, including digital signal processing and DNN inference, and how I take advantage of this work to revolutionize the FPGA programming paradigm.
Prof. Sven Dietrich, the Computer Science Department, Hunter College, the City University of New York (CUNY)
Thursday, February 09, 2023, 15:30
- 16:30
Building 5, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
Vulnerability discovery can be challenging: many software packages, both open and closed-source projects, build on existing code from public software repositories to network drives, derived from earlier versions or related software packages. Even implemented protocols rely on such repositories. It is important to detect such copies of code when the original code contains a software vulnerability, especially one that is exploitable, as seen with flaws such as the bash vulnerability Shellshock or the SSL vulnerability Heartbleed.
Prof. George Mohler, Computer Science, Boston College
Wednesday, February 08, 2023, 17:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/8570786729
Contact Person
In this talk we first provide an introduction to point processes, which are stochastic models for the occurrence of events in space and time. We then discuss the application of point processes to investigate the relationship between law enforcement drug seizures and accidental overdoses in Indianapolis. We will also discuss results from a field-experiment in Indianapolis where point process based harm indices were used to inform the distribution of addiction treatment information. 
Prof. Huseyin Arslan, Dean of Faculty of Engineering at Istanbul Medipol University
Wednesday, February 08, 2023, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Contact Person
In this presentation, we will cover both communication and sensing security from a broader perspective. Even though, more emphasis on PHY security is given, other security measures will also be covered for the sake of completeness and as a step towards cross-layer security and cognitive security vision.
Andrea Bianco, Full Professor, Electronics and Telecommunications Department at Politecnico di Torino
Wednesday, February 08, 2023, 13:00
- 14:00
Building 9, Level 4, Room 4125
Contact Person
Machine Learning (ML) tools have recently been adopted for a wide range of automated operations in optical networking, moving fundamental steps towards the paradigm of zero-touch infrastructures. One example of such tasks is estimating the Quality of transmission of a lightpath prior to its establishment, which is particularly challenging due to the non-linear characteristics of signal propagation in optical fibers and to the often-incomplete knowledge of equipment parameters. This talk provides an overview of the contribution of my research team in the field of ML-based lightpath QoT estimation, including transfer learning approaches for inter-domain model adaptation, active learning for model building with small-sized training dataset, quantification of prediction uncertainty, and adoption of Explainable AI framework to expose the internal decisional mechanisms of trained models.
Dr. Zhanxing Zhu, Senior Research Professor. Changping National lab, Beijing
Tuesday, February 07, 2023, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
Coffee Time: 15:30-16:00. It has been a long-standing debate that “Is deep learning alchemy or science? ”, since the success of deep learning mainly relies on various engineering design and tricks, and lack of theoretical foundation. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanism of deep learning is still mysterious, severely limiting its further development from both theoretical and application aspects.
Tuesday, February 07, 2023, 15:00
- 17:00
Building 4, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
Neuromorphic computing has emerged as a new and promising computing principle that emulates how human brains process information. The underlying spiking neural networks (SNNs) are well-known for having higher energy efficiency than artificial neural networks (ANNs). Neuromorphic systems enable highly parallel computation and reduce memory bandwidth limitations, making hardware performance scalable and sustainable given the ever-increasing complexities of artificial intelligence (AI). Inefficiency in the design of a neuromorphic system generally originates from redundant parameters, nonoptimized models, a lack of computing parallelism, and inefficient training algorithms. This dissertation aims to address these problems and propose effective solutions.
Bio-Hackathon MENA 2023
Tuesday, February 07, 2023, 08:00
- 17:00
KAUST Hotel
Contact Person
Bioinformatics experts, Don’t miss the opportunity to collaborate with researchers and field professionals in the BioHackathonMENA2023 event. BioHackathon events involve a large number of people that meet on-site to discuss ideas and implement projects in a collaborative manner during intensive coding sessions.
Luigi C. Berselli, Visiting Faculty, University of Pisa
Monday, February 06, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3128
Contact Person
The understanding and description of turbulent flows poses several different problems in which theory, modeling, and (numerical) experiments interact in a multidisciplinary way. In this talk we present some of the basic tools, focusing on the mathematical foundation of the models used to describe the larger scales of the incompressible motions at high Reynolds number. Recent perspectives and open problems are also discussed.
Monday, February 06, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325, Hall 2
Contact Person
In this work we focus our attention on distributed optimization problems in the context where the communication time between the server and the workers is non-negligible. We obtain novel methods supporting bidirectional compression (both from the server to the workers and vice versa) that enjoy new state-of-the-art theoretical communication complexity for convex and nonconvex problems.
Sunday, February 05, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Wave functional materials are artificial materials that can control wave propagation as wish. In this talk, I will give a brief review on the progress of wave functional materials and reveal the secret behind the engineering of these materials to achieve desired properties.  In particular, I will focus on our contributions on metamaterials and metasurfaces.
Prof. David Bromberg, Distributed computing systems, University of Rennes (IRISA)
Thursday, February 02, 2023, 15:30
- 16:30
Building 4, Level 5, Room 5220.
Contact Person
In this talk we will explore how research in systems and distributed systems may improve the resilience to cyber attacks following 3 axes targeting mobile systems, distributed systems, and operating systems
Prof. Ricardo Henao, Associate Professor, BESE Division, KAUST
Wednesday, February 01, 2023, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5220
Contact Person
We propose a structured latent ODE model that explicitly captures system input variations within its latent representation. Building on a static latent variable specification, our model learns (independent) stochastic factors of variation for each input to the system, thus separating the effects of the system inputs in the latent space. This approach provides actionable modeling through the controlled generation of time-series data for novel input combinations (or perturbations). Additionally, we propose a flexible approach for quantifying uncertainties, leveraging a quantile regression formulation.