Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:00
- 23:00
KAUST
The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners in the interdisciplinary field of biodevices, which spans across electronics, medicine, engineering, material sciences, and related areas.  The conference is a continuation of a series that started this year with the KAUST Research Conference on New Trends in Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
Muhammad Rizwan Asghar, Senior Lecturer, School of Computer Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand
Tuesday, December 03, 2019, 09:45
- 10:45
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
In this talk, we will discuss the framework, named Oblivion, that we have developed to support the automation of the ‘right to be forgotten’ in a scalable, provable and privacy-preserving manner. Further, we will talk about potential research challenges in enforcing the ‘right to be forgotten’.
Monday, December 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This talk will be a gentle introduction to proximal splitting algorithms to minimize a sum of possibly nonsmooth convex functions.
Dr Hamza Chaal, Development Engineer, Power Electronics & Systems, Siemens Wind Power, Keele, UK
Thursday, November 28, 2019, 14:30
- 16:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2121
In this talk, we are going to look at the modern direct-drive wind turbines, and in particular Siemens Gamesa offshore product portfolio. We will touch on the Levelized cost of energy (LCoE) and how innovation and industrialization of wind turbines contribute to lowering it persistently over the years. We will review the basic principle for controlling variable speed wind turbines then focus on the power converter system.
Prof. Daniele Durante, Department of Decision Sciences, Bocconi University, Italy
Wednesday, November 27, 2019, 15:30
- 16:30
B1 L4 room 4102

Abstract

There are several Bayesian models where the posterior density is not available in a closed

Prof. Ben Zhao, Computer Science, University of Chicago, USA
Monday, November 25, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will describe two recent results on detecting and understanding backdoor attacks on deep learning systems. I will first present Neural Cleanse (IEEE S&P 2019), the first robust tool to detect a wide range of backdoors in deep learning models. We use the idea of perturbation distances between classification labels to detect when a backdoor trigger has created shortcuts to misclassification to a particular label.  Second, I will also summarize our new work on Latent Backdoors (CCS 2019), a stronger type of backdoor attack that is more difficult to detect and survives retraining in commonly used transfer learning systems. Latent backdoors are robust and stealthy, even against the latest detection tools (including neural cleanse).
Prof. Luca Chiaraviglio is a Tenure Track Assistant Professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy)
Sunday, November 24, 2019, 13:30
- 14:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119

Abstract

5G networks are currently facing the first installation steps in many countries.

Ahmed E. Kamal, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
Sunday, November 24, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B1, L3, Conference Room 3119
The European Telecom Standards Institute (ETSI) introduced the concept of Network Function Virtualization (NFV) with the aim of efficient network architecture and network system operation. In traditional networks, network functions are implemented in dedicated physical machines which are designed for single functionalities. Network services have been provided by connecting these physical machines, so the network architecture has been highly rigid and hard to change. NFV environment provides a more flexible and scalable network configuration and implementation through the softwarization of physical network functions. Network functions are transformed to Virtual Machines (VMs) so that Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) can be implemented in commodity servers built for common uses, including public clouds.
Thursday, November 21, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
I will present an overview of our activities around estimation problems for partial and fractional differential equations. I will present the methods and the algorithms we develop for the state, source and parameters estimation and illustrate the results with some simulations and real applications.
Dr. Joris van de Klundert, Professor of Operations Management, Prince Mohammad Bin Salman College (MBSC) of Business & Entrepreneurship
Monday, November 18, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This research formally models, analyzes and maximizes equity of transplant waiting times and probabilities using queuing theory and network flows, based on Rawls' theory of justice. The presented formal models address inequities resulting from blood type incompatibilities, which are interrelated to ethnic differences in patient and donor rates.
Monday, November 18, 2019, 00:00
- 23:45
Auditorium 0215, between building 2 and 3
2019 Statistics and Data Science Workshop confirmed speakers include Prof. Alexander Aue, University of California Davis, USA, Prof. Francois Bachoc, University Toulouse 3, France, Prof. Rosa M. Crujeiras Casais, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Prof. Emanuele Giorgi, Lancaster University, UK, Prof. Jeremy Heng, ESSEC Asia-Pacific, Singapore, Prof. Birgir Hrafnkelsson, University of Iceland, Iceland, Prof. Ajay Jasra, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Emtiyaz Khan, RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project, Japan, Prof. Robert Krafty, University of Pittsburgh, USA, Prof. Guido Kuersteiner, University of Maryland, USA, Prof. Paula Moraga, University of Bath, UK, Prof. Tadeusz Patzek, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Brian Reich, North Carolina State University, USA, Prof. Dag Tjostheim, University Bergen, Norway, Prof. Xiangliang Zhang, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Sylvia Rose Esterby, University of British Colombia, Canada, Prof. Abdel El-Shaarawi, Retired Professor at the National Water Research Institute, Canada. View Workshop schedule and abstracts here.
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This talk will introduce current challenges and methods in Biophotonics which relate to the research work carried out at the Vibrational Imaging Lab at KAUST.
Thursday, November 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
Over the past 30 years, my research has focused on problems involving aerospace information systems, give or take a couple of exceptions - I also seem to like things with wheels-. In the talk, I will introduce and discuss a few research topics that, I believe, best describe the kind of research I like to perform. The topics will include things as diverse as drones, airports, and the hunt for Lyapunov functions. I will also introduce an educational initiative focusing on systematically restoring "the sense of touch" in all Engineering disciplines, and which I would like to experiment with as part of the courses I will be in charge of at KAUST.
Prof. David Bolin, Statistics, KAUST
Thursday, November 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
The talk will give an overview of some recent developments of statistical models based on stochastic partial differential equations. We will in particular focus on equations with non-local differential operators or non-Gaussian driving noise, and explain when any why such models are useful. As motivating applications, analysis of longitudinal medical data and ocean waves will be considered.
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 16:30
- 18:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3125
Physically compliant electronics are scientifically intriguing, mechanically complex, ‎technologically ‎challenging but with huge socio-economical potential. Until now the target applications ‎for ‎flexible electronics have been limited to displays, solar cells, printed batteries, wearables, and ‎implantable. However, with the emergence and growth of Internet of Things (IoT) devices ‎worldwide ‎from nearly 27 billion in 2017 to 125 billion in 2030, in this PhD research, expanding the ‎horizon of ‎applications for flexible electronics toward existing “things” will be explored. Low-cost sustainable materials as active electronic materials and a ‎Do-It-Yourself (DIY) integration strategy is used to build “Add-on” standalone sensory system which can be ‎attached to any ‎existing things like a decal. Such electronics can also be embedded in newly minted ‎devices specially ‎using additive methods.
Prof. David L. Donoho, Department of Statistics, Stanford University
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 15:00
- 16:00
Building 19, MOSTI Auditorium
We consider the problem of recovering a low-rank signal matrix in the presence of a general, unknown additive noise; more specifically, noise where the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix have a general bulk distribution. We assume given an upper bound for the rank of the assumed orthogonally invariant signal, and develop a selector for hard thresholding of singular values, which adapts to the unknown correlation structure of the noise.
Prof. Sayeef Salahuddin, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California Berkeley
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3125
Power constraint has become a critical challenge for computing, restricting the rate at which data can be processed. The physics of ordered and correlated systems allow for fundamental improvement of the energy efficiency in this regard, going beyond what is possible with conventional materials in today’s computing hardware. One such example is the the ferroelectric materials, where thermodynamics dictate that charge can be switched with much lower energy compared to conventional dielectrics. This leads to a situation where a ferroelectric material can be stabilized at a state of negative capacitance. In this talk, I shall discuss our experimental work demonstrating the stabilization of negative capacitance, its integration into advanced transistors, and its potential impact on next generation computing hardware.
Prof. David L. Donoho, Department of Statistics, Stanford University
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325
A variety of intriguing patterns in eigenvalues were observed and speculated about in ML conference papers. We describe the work of Vardan Papyan showing that the traditional subdisciplines, properly deployed, can offer insights about these objects that ML researchers had.
Monday, November 11, 2019, 18:00
- 20:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
In this dissertation, the design and fabrication of deep-ultraviolet photodetectors, based on gallium oxide and its alloys, through the heterogeneous integration with metallic and other inorganic materials is investigated. The crystallographic properties of grown oxide films formed directly and indirectly on silicon, magnesium oxide, and sapphire are examined, and the challenges that hinder the realization of efficient and reliable deep-ultraviolet photodetectors are elaborated on. I provide an overview of aluminum nitride, gallium oxide, sapphire, and silicon substrates as platforms for deep-ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, in which I elaborate on the challenges associated with using sapphire as a platform for efficient deep-ultraviolet devices and detail advancements in device growth and fabrication on silicon and magnesium oxide substrates.
Prof. Mario Lanza, Nanoelectronics, Soochow University
Monday, November 11, 2019, 15:45
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
In this seminar, I will present the first wafer-scale statistical analysis of memristive crossbar arrays made of 2D layered materials. By using chemical vapor deposited multilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets, we have fabricated metal/h-BN/metal memristive crossbar arrays that exhibit high yield ~98%, and low device-to-device variability. The devices showed record electrical performance, including stable operation at ultra-low currents down to 110 fA in low resistive state, ON/OFF current ratios up to 1011, record non-linearity of <0.09 mV/decade, and unprecedented low energy consumption down to 4.4 zJ/transition. Furthermore, the miniaturization of metal/h-BN/metal memristors has been demonstrated by using nanodot (Ø < 50 nm) electrodes. These findings may accelerate the use of 2D materials for building wafer-scale and high-density electronic memories and artificial neural networks.
Monday, November 11, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Adil Salim is mainly interested in stochastic approximation, optimization, and machine learning. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Professor Peter Richtarik at the Visual Computing Center (VCC) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Sunday, November 10, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Tareq Al-Naffouri is a professor of Electrical Engineering (EE) and Principale investigator of the Information System Lab (ISL). He is also an active member of the Sensor Initiative (SI) at the King Abdullah University of Sciences and Technology, Saudi Arabia.