Teaching

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We offer Master’s Thesis Research (CS 297), Doctoral Dissertation Research (CS 397), Directed Research (CS 299/CS399) to our KAUST students. For students outside KAUST, we host Saudi Internship Programs and the Visiting Students Research Program.

 

 

Fall 2021

CS 248 | Computer Graphics

The Computer Graphics course teaches the fundamentals of computer graphics based on the book "Fundamentals of Computer Graphics, 4th Edition by Steve Marschner and Peter Shirley". The course first reviews the basic mathematical background necessary for computer graphics. Then fundamental computer graphics methods are being presented, such as the graphics pipeline, ray tracing, surface shading, and texturing. After the basal computer graphics knowledge, fundamental theoretical background from signal processing and sampling are explained necessary for the comprehension of furthermore advanced computer graphics topics. Advanced topics will include computer animation, global illumination, light, color, introduction to visual perception and tone mapping, as well as global illumination, hardware-accelerated rasterization graphics, computer graphics in games and visualization.

https://courses.kaust.edu.sa/StudentCourses/ViewPdf?fileName=2021-Fall-CS_248-00007204.pdf&isExternal=True

Spring 2019/2020

CS 390H | Special Topics in Visualization

The course starts by discussing the role of human visual perception in visualization. Then illustrative techniques that directly take the human processing into account in designing effective visualizations are explained. First algorithms for effective visual appearance models are explained, such as illustrative shading and line drawing techniques. Afterwards, techniques that expressively convey data insights, such as visibility management techniques, guidance, and navigation techniques are covered. Finally, the course introduces various forms of experimental research for visualization design on how to design a user experiment and how to analyze it.

 

Spring 2018/2019

CS 390H | Special Topics in Visualization

The course starts by discussing the role of human visual perception and introduces various forms of experimental research for visualization design. Then illustrative techniques that directly take the human processing into account in designing effective visualizations are explained. The first algorithms for effective visual appearance models are explained. Afterward, techniques that expressively convey data insights, such as visibility management techniques, guidance, and navigation techniques are covered. The second part of the course provides in-depth knowledge of molecular visualization. First, technically oriented lectures convey how interactive performance for molecular representations and visualization can be achieved. Then we discuss how to procedurally generate scientifically-accurate molecular scenes and how dynamic molecular models can be visualized. Finally, visualization and geometric techniques that convey molecular dynamics simulations and DNA-nanotechnology models are explained.