Sunday, June 30, 2024, 11:00
- 12:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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Molecular communication (MC) is a promising paradigm for information transmission in complex environments, such as living cells and porous media. While most existing works consider standard diffusion, where the mean square displacement (MSD) of information molecules (IMs) scales linearly with time, this dissertation focuses on sub-diffusive dynamics in crowded and complex environments. The primary objectives of this research are to model, simulate, and analyze the performance of MC systems in sub-diffusive environments.
Thursday, June 27, 2024, 10:30
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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This dissertation examines the deployment of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks to enhance Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity across extensive geographic regions, including remote and rural areas where terrestrial infrastructure is insufficient. Through a comprehensive study structured into three main areas, this research addresses uplink performance, energy sustainability, and security challenges associated with LEO satellite communications.
Tuesday, June 04, 2024, 11:00
- 13:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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The Dual-function radar communication (DFRC) refers to an integrated system that performs both the functions of a radar and a communication system. It is designed by exploiting the tractability and reusability of both radar and communication systems' components, parameters, and spectrum to achieve an integrated system. This dissertation explores and exploits the flexibility in the transmit beampattern design in MIMO radar systems to implement the transmission of communication symbols.
Prof. Francesca Gardini, Università di Pavia
Tuesday, April 30, 2024, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
We will discuss the solution of eigenvalue problems associated with partial differential equations (PDE)s that can be written in the generalised form Ax = λMx, where the matrices A and/or M may depend on a scalar parameter. Parameter dependent matrices occur frequently when stabilised formulations are used for the numerical approximation of PDEs. With the help of classical numerical examples we will show that the presence of one (or both) parameters can produce unexpected results.
Prof. Silvia Bertoluzza
Tuesday, March 05, 2024, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
We present a theoretical analysis of the Weak Adversarial Networks (WAN) method, recently proposed in [1, 2], as a method for approximating the solution of partial differential equations in high dimensions and tested in the framework of inverse problems. In a very general abstract framework.
Prof. Christof Schmidhuber, ZHAW School of Engineering
Tuesday, February 27, 2024, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322
Analogies between financial markets and critical phenomena have long been observed empirically. So far, no convincing theory has emerged that can explain these empirical observations. Here, we take a step towards such a theory by modeling financial markets as a lattice gas.
Prof. Dr. Victorita Dolean, Mathematics and Computer Science, Scientific Computing, TU Eindhoven
Tuesday, February 06, 2024, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Wave propagation and scattering problems are of huge importance in many applications in science and engineering - e.g., in seismic and medical imaging and more generally in acoustics and electromagnetics.
Prof. Zhiming Chen, Academy of mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Wednesday, January 24, 2024, 14:30
- 16:00
Building 4, Level 5, Room 5220
In this short course, we will introduce some elements in deriving the hp a posteriori error estimate for a high-order unfitted finite element method for elliptic interface problems. The key ingredient is an hp domain inverse estimate, which allows us to prove a sharp lower bound of the hp a posteriori error estimator.
Wednesday, November 29, 2023, 16:30
- 18:30
Building 1, Level 2, Room 2202
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In the first part of this thesis, we have discussed the Cram ́er-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to evaluate the performance of beam tracking for a joint beam tracking and symbol detection scheme in deep-space optical communications.
Sunday, November 26, 2023, 11:30
- 13:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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Due to a variety of potential barriers to sample acquisition, many of the datasets encountered in important classification applications, ranging from tumor identification to facial recognition, are characterized by small samples of high-dimensional data. In such situations, linear classifiers are popular as they have less risk of overfitting while being faster and more interpretable than non-linear classifiers. They are also easier to understand and implement for the inexperienced practitioner.
Sunday, October 08, 2023, 13:00
- 14:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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During the last decade, the demand for wireless connection over the world has tremendously increased, including the areas where unconnected. Raising with topics like "Breaking down the data divide," "Connect to unconnected," etc. In the sixth-generation wireless network, the underwater world attracts a lot of attention. Besides that, the huge unexplored resource is another driving force for underwater exploration. Unlike the well-developed Internet of Things (IoT) on the terrestrial, there is almost no underwater wireless communication network, not to mention the underwater IoT.
Thursday, September 28, 2023, 10:00
- 11:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214
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Whether the future of transportation is going to be electric or not is no longer a question. Electric vehicles (EVs) offer several benefits toward global sustainability. However, without a variety of charging infrastructures that cover diverse forthcoming charging needs, the speed of vehicle electrification may be slow and limited. In the coming years, we project that charging stations will still likely meet most personal demands. However, novel charging alternatives such as dynamic charging systems, i.e., electrified roads that wirelessly charge EVs on the go, will fit into various public and commercial scenarios. In this thesis, we present a driver-centric approach to planning these infrastructures.
Sunday, June 04, 2023, 12:30
- 14:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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The goal of this work is to investigate and advance a research on various topics, vital for the development of the future generations of optical communication technology. In the first part of the work, we present a fast and efficient simulation method of structured light free space optics (FSO) channel effects from propagation through the turbulent atmosphere.
Monday, January 30, 2023, 08:30
- 13:00
Building 19, Level 3, Hall 1
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The role of Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) in bringing about a revolution in almost all aspects of human life needs no introduction. As the standardization of the fifth generation (5G) of wireless communication systems (WCSs) has been completed, 6G is expected to be the next focus in wireless communication and networking and aim to provide new superior communication services to meet the future hyper-connectivity demands in the 2030s. With this background, this Summit aims to go over the recently proposed solutions not only to connect the unconnected/under-connected but also to super-connect the connected.
Tuesday, December 13, 2022, 10:00
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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Free-space optical communication (FSO) has been proposed as an attractive alternative to radio frequency communication in the sense that it provides wide bandwidth and high capacity without the requirement of a license. However, the scalability of the FSO link is limited by pointing errors, atmospheric turbulence, and loss. Especially, when it comes to the FSO link between moving platforms, it is imperative works to analyze the statistical channel model considering accurate pointing errors and atmospheric turbulence at the same time. In this paper, we analyze the performance of FSO links over various atmospheric situations with pointing errors.
Sunday, December 11, 2022, 08:00
- 10:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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Satellite communication (SatCom) is an essential component of next-generation wireless communications. The existing terrestrial network will be overwhelmed due to the rapid growth of demand for data and serving remote areas by using only terrestrial networks is demanding. In addition, terrestrial communications are susceptible to natural disasters such as earthquakes and floods. In order to overcome these disadvantages of the terrestrial communication systems, SatCom systems are being deployed and covering remote or sparsely populated areas. However, research on SatCom is still not enough and it has not been studied as much as on terrestrial communication.
Thursday, June 23, 2022, 16:00
- 18:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3-123
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Reconfigurable intelligent surfaces (RISs) are now considered among the key enabling technologies for 6G systems. Empowered by the recent advances in meta-material, RISs are equipped with a large number of low-cost passive elements that allow for the modification of the radio waves in that they reflect, refract, and scatter radio signals in a controllable fashion to counteract the destructive effect of multipath fading. These features can be leveraged to transform the propagation environment into a smart space that can be programmable for the benefit of the communication application. Throughout this proposal, we study RIS-assisted systems from different perspectives, including performance analysis, system optimization, and channel estimation, to analyze and enhance the operation of such systems in different setups. Some possible future research directions to be considered are also highlighted.
Atif Shamim, Mohamed-Slim Alouini, Hakan Bagci
Monday, March 21, 2022, 08:30
- 17:30
Campus Library Seaside and virtual (please click registration link at the bottom)
The technological evolution has led to the current high-performing wireless communication systems that we use on a daily basis. However, coping with the increasing demand is becoming more and more challenging, especially since we are approaching the limits of what can be done with the available resources. One of these resources is bandwidth. This spectrum scarcity problem has motivated researchers to explore new frequencies for wireless communications. Due to this reason, the upper radio-frequency (RF) spectrum, from mmWave and THz to optical bands, is being pursued, which is termed as “Extreme Bandwidth Communication.” This conference brings world experts and the brightest minds from academia and industry to present the latest trends, challenges, results, and opportunities in the field of extreme bandwidth communication.
Monday, October 11, 2021, 17:00
- 18:00
KAUST
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Hardware impairments (HWIs) impose a huge challenge on modern wireless communication systems owing to the characteristics like compactness, least complexity, cost effectiveness and high energy efficiency. Numerous techniques are implemented to minimize the detrimental effects of these HWIs ,however, the residual HWIs may still appear as an additive distortion, multiplicative interference, or an aggregate of both. Numerous studies have commenced efforts to model one or the other forms of hardware impairments in the radio frequency (RF) transceivers. Many presented the widely linear model for in-phase and quadrature imbalance (IQI) but failed to recognize the impropriety induced in the system because of the self-interfering signals. Therefore, we have presented not only a rigorous aggregate impairment model along with its complete impropriety statistical characterization but also the appropriate performance analysis to quantify their degradation effects. Latest advances have endorsed the superiority of incorporating more generalized impropriety phenomenon as opposed to conventional propriety.
Thursday, April 08, 2021, 11:00
- 13:00
KAUST
Contact Person
Machine learning is emerging as a powerful tool to data science and is being applied in almost all subjects. In many applications, the number of features is comparable or even larger than the number of samples, and both grow large. This setting is usually named the high-dimensional regime. In this regime, new challenges and questions arise when it comes to the application of machine learning. In this work, we conduct a high-dimensional performance analysis of some popular classification and regression techniques. In a first part, discriminant analysis classifiers are considered. A major challenge towards the use of these classifiers in practice is that they depend on the inverse of covariance matrices that need to be estimated from training data. Several estimators for the inverse of the covariance matrices can be used. The most common ones are estimators based on the regularization approach. The main advantage of such estimators is their resilience to the sampling noise, making them suitable to high-dimensional settings. In this thesis, we propose new estimators that are shown to yield better performance.
Prof. Luca Chiaraviglio is a Tenure Track Assistant Professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy)
Sunday, November 24, 2019, 13:30
- 14:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
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Abstract

5G networks are currently facing the first installation steps

Dr. Mehdi Bennis, Associate Professor, Centre for Wireless Communications, University of Oulu
Monday, July 08, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B 1, L 3, Room 3119
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In just a few years, breakthroughs in machine learning (ML) and particularly deep learning have transformed every aspects of our lives from face recognition, medical diagnosis, and natural language processing. This progress has been fueled mainly by the availability of more data and more computing power. However, the current premise in classical ML is based on a single node in a centralized and remote data center with full access to a global dataset and a massive amount of storage and computing, sifting through this data for inference.
Monday, July 08, 2019, 08:30
- 10:30
Building 1, Level 2, Room 2202
The demand for wireless communication is ceaselessly increasing in terms of the number of subscribers and services. Future generations of cellular networks are expected to allow not only humans but also machines to be immersively connected. However, the radio frequency spectrum is already fully allocated. Therefore, developing techniques to increase spectrum efficiency has become necessary. In that context, this dissertation analyzes two spectrum sharing techniques that enable efficient utilization of the available radio resources in cellular networks. The first technique, called full-duplex (FD) communication, uses the same spectrum to transmit and receive simultaneously. The second spectrum sharing technique, called non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA), allows a transmitter to communicate with multiple receivers through the same frequency-time resource unit.
Prof. Liching Chiu, Graduate Program of Teaching Chinese as a Second Language (TCSL), National Taiwan University
Tuesday, July 02, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
This series of lectures guide students to the preparation and analysis of a well-organized abstract. We will discuss the proper language (tense, voice, and person) for abstract writing, and learn how to meet the purposes of different abstracts. Finally, students will have a chance to compose and evaluate their writing. Topics: Overview of abstract writing; Conference abstract journal abstract; Organization of an abstract; Language conventions of abstract writing; Disciplinary abstract analysis; Frequent mistakes of abstract writing.
Dr. Faissal El Bouanani, Chair of CommNet and ACOSIS conferences
Monday, July 01, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B1, L2, R2202
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Abstract

In the last decade, with the emergence of the internet of things (IoT) as well as machine