Isaías de Sousa is an electrical engineering graduate from Brazil.  He obtained his master's degree from the Federal University of Campina Grande and his bachelor's degree from the Federal University of Piauí, Brazil, respectively. Isaías will join KAUST in the fall of 2020 as a Ph.D. candidate in the KAUST Sensors Lab under Professor Khaled Nabil Salama's supervision.
Soon-to-be graduate Imran Pervez will join KAUST from Aligarh Muslim University, India. An initial reference from a friend piqued his initial interest in joining KAUST. This interest in joining was solidified by an inspiring interaction with Professor Khalid Nabil Salama, which further convinced Pervez to join KAUST.
Olga Krestinskaya, from Kazakhstan, obtained her master’s and bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and electronics from Nazarbayev University, Kazakhstan. She is the recipient of the IEEE Circuits and Systems (CAS) society pre-doctoral award in 2019 and will join KAUST in the fall of 2020 as a Ph.D. candidate in the KAUST Sensors Lab under the supervision of Professor Khaled Nabil Salama.
Carlos Augusto Zan Malaguti, 23, from Brazil, obtained his bachelor’s degree in electronics and telecommunications engineering from Sao Paulo State University (UNESP). Carlos will join KAUST in the fall of 2020 as an M.S./Ph.D. candidate in the KAUST Sensors Lab under the supervision of Professor Khaled Nabil Salama.
She loves watching films not for the plot, but in order to rethink her beliefs. She is 22, she graduates from the School of Engineering in the capital. Adilya Bakambekova may seem ordinary: she loves walking in the park, powerlifting, taking care of her five-year-old wiener dog.
In today’s world, it should come as no surprise that plastic dominates the products that we rely on each and every day. From our technology devices, to our water bottles, plastic is almost always an integral structural component.

Saravanan Yuvaraja, et al., "Realization of an Ultrasensitive and Highly Selective OFET NO2 Sensor: The Synergistic Combination of PDVT-10 Polymer and Porphyrin–MOF." ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 12 (16), 2020, 18748.

Imagine if there was a revolutionary wearable technology that could enable the user to open doors or operate machinery with a simple wave of their hand or a mere blink of their eye? What people might not realize is that this contact-free human-machine technology already exists—and it has been developed right here in a laboratory at KAUST.