Professor Roberto Di Pietro, College of Science and Engineering, Cybersecurity at Hamad Bin Khalifa University
Monday, February 14, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322, Hall 1
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Our standard of living, nation GDP,  and, in some cases, even our safety rely on critical infrastructures (CIs). In particular, being CIs generally perceived as a commodity (think of GPS availability, or avionics & maritime traffic routes and hubs), their security has largely been overlooked. The emergent property is that, nowadays, CIs systems are generally fragile, especially with respect to cyber attacks.
Benjamin L. Gerard, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, UC Observatories
Wednesday, February 02, 2022, 16:30
- 17:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/95518154022
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Over 4000 exoplanets - planets beyond the Solar System - have been discovered since the first Nobel prize-winning exoplanet detection around a Sun-like star in 1995. The majority of these exoplanets have been detected by indirect methods, inferring the presence of the exoplanet by observing the star.
Monday, January 31, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98631999457
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The qualitative study of PDEs often relies on integral identities and inequalities. For example, for time-dependent PDEs, conserved integral quantities or quantities that are dissipated play an important role. In particular, if these integral quantities have a definite sign, they are of great interest as they may provide control on the solutions to establish well-posedness.
Monday, January 24, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98631999457
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Dynamic programming is an efficient technique to solve optimization problems. It is based on decomposing the initial problem into simpler ones and solving these sub-problems beginning from the simplest ones.
Christos-Savvas Bouganis, Reader in Intelligent Digital Systems in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, UK
Monday, December 06, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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The talk will discuss the challenging problem of designing Deep Neural Network systems that achieve high performance under low power envelopes, hindering their deployment in the embedded space.
Professor Miguel Correia, Computer Science and Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa
Wednesday, December 01, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223, https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96226287632
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The seminar is an overview on my research path and approach. I will start with my initial research on the concept of intrusion tolerance and present some of the results I had at the time. Then, I will show how this initial research had led me to other areas and related approaches: software security, trusted computing, intrusion detection, intrusion recovery, and blockchain interoperability. I will present with some detail very recent research on securely moving data between trusted execution environments (TEEs) in a non-interactive way, a problem that must be solved for digital id crypto wallets starting to appear in Europe and elsewhere.
Monday, November 29, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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Sparse tensors appear frequently in distributed deep learning, either as a direct artifact of the deep neural network's gradients, or as a result of an explicit sparsification process. Most communication primitives are agnostic to the peculiarities of deep learning; consequently, they impose unnecessary communication overhead.
Gabriel Ghinita, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Sunday, November 28, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322, https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96553196829
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Skyline computation is an increasingly popular query, with broad applicability to many domains. Given the trend to outsource databases, and due to the sensitive nature of the data (e.g., in healthcare), it is essential to evaluate skylines on encrypted datasets.
Monday, November 22, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Bldg. 9, R. 2322, Hall 1
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The life sciences have invested significant resources in the development and application of semantic technologies to make research data accessible and interlinked, and to enable the integration and analysis of data. Utilizing the semantics associated with research data in data analysis approaches is often challenging. Now, novel methods are becoming available that combine symbolic methods and statistical methods in Artificial Intelligence. In my talk, I will show how to incorporate biological background knowledge in machine learning models for identification of gene-disease associations, genomic variants that are causative for heritable disorders, and to predict protein functions. The methods I describe are generic and can be applied in other domains in which biomedical ontologies and structured knowledge bases exist.
Valerio Schiavoni, Scientific Coordinator and Lecturer, Centre of Competence for Complex Systems and Big Data, University of Neuchâtel
Thursday, November 11, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223, https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96526753797
Contact Person
Available as dedicated hardware components into several mobile and server-grade processors, and recently included in infrastructure-as-a-service commercial offerings by several cloud providers, TEEs allow applications with high privacy and confidentiality demands to be deployed and executed over untrusted environments, shielding data and code from compromised systems or powerful attackers. After an  introduction to basic concepts for TEEs, I will survey some of our most recent contributions exploiting TEEs, including as defensive tools in the context of Federated Learning, as support to build secure cache systems for edge networks, as protection mechanisms in a med-tech/e-health context,  shielding novel environments (ie, WebAssembly), and more. Finally, I will highlight some of the lessons learned and offer open perspectives, hopefully useful and inspirational to future researchers and practitioners entering this exciting area of research.
Jesper Tegner, Professor, Computer Science, KAUST
Monday, November 08, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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The natural sciences such as biology, medicine, and chemistry are currently in a transformative stage. Progress in technologies for measuring and collecting data (sequences, images, and molecules) has exploded since the human genome project. In parallel, we have witnessed stunning advances in what can broadly be referred to as computational techniques. This includes data-driven analysis of data such as Machine learning and Artificial Intelligence. From an ML/AI standpoint, there is a renewed interest in classical” equation-based modeling, causal analysis, and generative probabilistic modeling techniques. BioAI refers to this “perfect storm” between Bio and AI.
Tuesday, November 02, 2021, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91954695269
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Human knowledge can facilitate the evolution of artificial intelligence towards learning the capability of planning and reasoning and has been the critical element for developing the next-generation artificial intelligence. Although knowledge collection and organization have achieved significant progress, it is still non-trivial to construct a comprehensive knowledge graph for downstream applications. The difficulty motivates the study of knowledge association to resolve the problem, yet current solutions suffer from two primary shortages, i.e., generalization and robustness. Specifically, most existing methods require a sufficient number of labeled data and ignore the effective utilization of complex relationships between entities, limiting the generalization ability of knowledge association approaches. Moreover, prevailing approaches severely rely on clean labeled data, making the model vulnerable to noises in the given labeled data. These shortages motivate the research on generalization and robustness of knowledge association in this dissertation. 
Monday, November 01, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Bldg. 9, R. 2322, Hall 1
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Error feedback (EF), also known as error compensation, is an immensely popular convergence stabilization mechanism in the context of distributed training of supervised machine learning models enhanced by the use of contractive communication compression mechanisms, such as Top-k. First proposed by Seide et al (2014) as a heuristic, EF resisted any theoretical understanding until recently [Stich et al., 2018, Alistarh et al., 2018].
Monday, October 25, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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The human race is facing what may turn out to be an existential threat due to entrenched practices that are contributing to climate change. This talk addresses the impact of information technology (IT) in this regard.
Monday, October 11, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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A traditional goal of algorithmic optimality, squeezing out operations, has been superseded because of evolution in architecture. Algorithms must now squeeze memory, data transfers, and synchronizations, while extra operations on locally cached data cost relatively little time or energy. Hierarchically low-rank matrices realize a rarely achieved combination of optimal storage complexity and high-computational intensity in approximating a wide class of formally dense operators that arise in exascale applications.
Monday, October 04, 2021, 17:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/91912026865?pwd=UUxOV25wWWNyYllwdlhia1lGbDN2dz09
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In this thesis, we discuss some new developments in optimization inspired by the needs and practice of machine learning, federated learning, and data science. In particular, we consider seven key challenges of mathematical optimization that are relevant to modern machine learning applications, and develop a solution to each.
Ricardo Pérez-Marco, Visiting Professor at KAUST, CNRS researcher in Paris
Monday, October 04, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322 Lecture Hall #1
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About 12 years ago, Bitcoin was created as the first form of decentralized money, with some of the properties of Nash's ideal money. The protocol proposes a novel probabilistic consensus mechanism, that has the potential to automatize and decentralize many other human activities. The Bitcoin network also provides the first decentralized clock, and has a rich statistical physics interpretation. We will explore the foundations of "Decentralization Theory" and explore what can be expected as future developments.
Charalambos Konstantinou, Assistant Professor, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Monday, September 27, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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This talk will give an overview of the research of the Secure Next Generation Resilient Systems (SENTRY) lab (sentry.kaust.edu.sa) at KAUST. The transformation of critical infrastructures into cyber-physical systems contributes towards modernization allowing for better planning, more flexible control, system-wide optimization, etc. The security, however, of such systems presents significant challenges in controlling and maintaining secure access to critical system resources and services.
Monday, September 20, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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Classical imaging systems are characterized by the independent design of optics, sensors, and image processing algorithms. In contrast, computational imaging systems are based on a joint design of two or more of these components, which allows for greater flexibility of the type of captured information beyond classical 2D photos, as well as for new form factors and domain-specific imaging systems. In this talk, I will describe how numerical optimization and learning-based methods can be used to achieve truly end-to-end optimized imaging systems that outperform classical solutions.
Monday, September 13, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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In this seminar, I will go over our journey in the underwater networks research work. Basically, I will highlight our recent work on bringing the Internet to underwater environments by deploying a low power and compact underwater optical wireless system, called Aqua-Fi, that support today’s Internet applications.
Monday, September 06, 2021, 16:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94131072784
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Computational imaging differs from traditional imaging systems by integrating an encoded measurement system and a tailored computational algorithm to extract interesting scene features. This dissertation demonstrates two approaches which apply computational imaging methods to the fluid domain. In the first approach, we study the problem of reconstructing time-varying 3D-3C fluid velocity vector fields. We extend 2D Particle Imaging Velocimetry to three dimensions by encoding depth into color.
Gabriel Ghinita, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston
Monday, September 06, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
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The mobile revolution of the past decade led to the ubiquitous presence of location data in all application domains, ranging from public safety and healthcare to urban planning, transportation and commercial applications. Numerous services rely on location data to provide customized service to their users. At the same time, there are serious concerns with respect to protecting individual privacy, as location traces can disclose sensitive details to an untrusted service.
Monday, August 30, 2021, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322 Lecture Hall #1
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This talk will give an overview of the research of the High-Performance Visualization research group (vccvisualization.org) at the KAUST Visual Computing Center (VCC). Interactive visualization is crucial to exploring, analyzing, and understanding large-scale scientific data, such as the data acquired in medicine or neurobiology using computed tomography or electron microscopy, and data resulting from large-scale simulations such as fluid flow in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans. The amount of data in data-driven science is increasing rapidly toward the petascale and further.