Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
The SLATE (Software for Linear Algebra Targeting Exascale) library is being developed to provide fundamental dense linear algebra capabilities for current and upcoming distributed high-performance systems, both accelerated CPU–GPU based and CPU based.
Monday, December 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This talk will be a gentle introduction to proximal splitting algorithms to minimize a sum of possibly nonsmooth convex functions. Several such algorithms date back to the 60s, but the last 10 years have seen the development of new primal-dual splitting algorithms, motivated by the need to solve large-scale problems in signal and image processing, machine learning, and more generally data science. No background will be necessary to attend the talk, whose goal is to present the intuitions behind this class of methods.
Sunday, December 01, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
The talk will discuss how recent advances in wireless computing and communication nodes can be harnessed to serve the multitude of deployment scenarios required to empower communities of the future with smart and connected systems. In this talk, we address fundamental questions that should be asked when contemplating future smart and connected systems, namely, How, Where and What? (1) How can we design computing and communication nodes that best utilize resources in a way that is cognizant of both the abilities of the platform, as well as the requirements of the network? (2) Where are the nodes deployed? By understanding the context of deployment, one can architect unique solutions that are currently unimaginable. With the transformation to diverse applications such as body area networking, critical infrastructure monitoring, precision agriculture, autonomous driving, etc., the need for innovative solutions becomes even more amplified. (3) What benefit can be inferred from the data gathered by nodes in the capacity of computing, communication, and sensing?
Prof. Ben Zhao, Computer Science, University of Chicago, USA
Monday, November 25, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will describe two recent results on detecting and understanding backdoor attacks on deep learning systems. I will first present Neural Cleanse (IEEE S&P 2019), the first robust tool to detect a wide range of backdoors in deep learning models. We use the idea of perturbation distances between classification labels to detect when a backdoor trigger has created shortcuts to misclassification to a particular label.  Second, I will also summarize our new work on Latent Backdoors (CCS 2019), a stronger type of backdoor attack that is more difficult to detect and survives retraining in commonly used transfer learning systems. Latent backdoors are robust and stealthy, even against the latest detection tools (including neural cleanse).
Ahmed E. Kamal, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
Sunday, November 24, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B1, L3, Conference Room 3119
The European Telecom Standards Institute (ETSI) introduced the concept of Network Function Virtualization (NFV) with the aim of efficient network architecture and network system operation. In traditional networks, network functions are implemented in dedicated physical machines which are designed for single functionalities. Network services have been provided by connecting these physical machines, so the network architecture has been highly rigid and hard to change. NFV environment provides a more flexible and scalable network configuration and implementation through the softwarization of physical network functions. Network functions are transformed to Virtual Machines (VMs) so that Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) can be implemented in commodity servers built for common uses, including public clouds.
Dr. Joris van de Klundert, Professor of Operations Management, Prince Mohammad Bin Salman College (MBSC) of Business & Entrepreneurship
Monday, November 18, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This research formally models, analyzes and maximizes equity of transplant waiting times and probabilities using queuing theory and network flows, based on Rawls' theory of justice. The presented formal models address inequities resulting from blood type incompatibilities, which are interrelated to ethnic differences in patient and donor rates.
Monday, November 11, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Adil Salim is mainly interested in stochastic approximation, optimization, and machine learning. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Professor Peter Richtarik at the Visual Computing Center (VCC) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Dr. William Kleiber, Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado, USA
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
In this talk, we explore a graphical model representation for the stochastic coefficients relying on the specification of the sparse precision matrix. Sparsity is encouraged in an L1-penalized likelihood framework. Estimation exploits a majorization-minimization approach. The result is a flexible nonstationary spatial model that is adaptable to very large datasets.
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
Large-scale particle data sets, such as those computed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, are crucial to investigating important processes in physics and thermodynamics. The simulated atoms are usually visualized as hard spheres with Phong shading, where individual particles and their local density can be perceived well in close-up views. However, for large-scale simulations with 10 million particles or more, the visualization of large fields-of-view usually suffers from strong aliasing artifacts, because the mismatch between data size and output resolution leads to severe under-sampling of the geometry.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday, November 04, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Dr. Michel Dumontier, Distinguished Professor of Data Science at Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Monday, November 04, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will discuss our work to create computational standards, platforms, and methods to wrangle knowledge into simple, but effective representations based on semantic web technologies that are maximally FAIR - Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reuseable - and to further use these for biomedical knowledge discovery. But only with additional crucial developments will this emerging Internet of FAIR data and services enable automated scientific discovery on a global scale.
Monday, November 04, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 3, Level 5 , Room 5209
The goal of this thesis is to pave the way towards the next generation of recommendation systems tackling such real-world challenges to improve the user experience while giving good recommendations.
Dr. Sumayah Alrwais, Assistant Professor, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA
Monday, October 21, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, Sumayah will survey a number of malicious hosting infrastructures for different services and approaches to detecting them. Among them are works on an emerging trend of Bulletproof hosting services reselling infrastructure from lower-end service providers, use of residential proxy as a service to avoid server-side blocking and DNS based hosting infrastructure.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223
This talk will try to clarify some misconceptions about what digital health (DH) is, and what it should not be.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325
Computing and communications infrastructures have become commodities that transact huge quantities of data and are pervasively interconnected, inside countries, and worldwide. Modern societies largely depend on them.
Monday, October 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Existing RDF engines are designed for specific hardware architectures; porting to a different architecture (e.g., GPUs) entails enormous implementation effort. We explore sparse matrix algebra as an alternative for designing a portable, scalable and efficient RDF engine.
Dr. Yunhai Wang, Professor, Computer Science, Shandong University, China
Wednesday, October 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325

Abstract

By providing visual representations