Charalambos (Harrys) Konstantinou, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering with Florida A&M University and Florida State University (FAMU-FSU) College of Engineering
Monday, February 24, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
Election hacking, power grid cyber-attacks, troll farms, fake news, ransomware, and other terms have entered our daily vocabularies and are here to stay. Cybersecurity touches nearly every part of our daily lives. Most importantly, national security and economic vitality rely on a safe, resilient, and stable cyber-space. We rely on cyber-physical systems with hardware devices, software platforms, and network systems to connect, travel, communicate, power our homes, provide health care, run our economy, etc. However, cyber-threats and attacks have grown exponentially over the past years, exposing both corporate and personal data, disrupting critical operations, causing a public health and safety impact, and imposing high costs on the economy. In this talk, we will focus on cyber-physical energy systems (CPES) as the backbone of critical infrastructure, and provide a research perspective and present red team security threats, challenges, and blue team countermeasures. We will discuss recent approaches on developing low-budget targeted cyberattacks against CPES, designing resilient methods against false data, and the need for an accurate assessment environment achieved through the inclusion of hardware-in-the-loop testbeds.
Sunday, February 16, 2020, 14:00
- 16:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5209
In this dissertation, I present the methods I have developed for prediction of promoters for different organisms. Instead of focusing on the classification accuracy of the discrimination between promoter and non-promoter sequences, I predict the exact positions of the TSS inside the genomic sequences, testing every possible location. The developed methods significantly outperform the previous promoter prediction programs by considerably reducing the number of false positive predictions. Specifically, to reduce the false positive rate, the models are adaptively and iteratively trained by changing the distribution of samples in the training set based on the false positive errors made in the previous iteration. The new methods are used to gain insights into the design principles of the core promoters. Using model analysis, I have identified the most important core promoter elements and their effect on the promoter activity. I have developed a novel general approach to detect long range interactions in the input of a deep learning model, which was used to find related positions inside the promoter region. The final model was applied to the genomes of different species without a significant drop in the performance, demonstrating a high generality of the developed method.
Wednesday, February 05, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Hall 1, Room 2322
The Machine Learning Hub Seminar Series presents “Optimization and Learning in Computational Imaging” by Dr. Wolfgang Heidrich, Professor in Computer Science at KAUST. He leads the AI Initiative and is the Director of the KAUST Visual Computing Center. Computational imaging systems are based on the joint design of optics and associated image reconstruction algorithms. Historically, many such systems have employed simple transform-based reconstruction methods. Modern optimization methods and priors can drastically improve the reconstruction quality in computational imaging systems. Furthermore, learning-based methods can be used to design the optics along with the reconstruction method, yielding truly end-to-end learned imaging systems, blurring the boundary between imaging hardware and software.
Monday, February 03, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will introduce several ongoing projects at the networking lab in KAUST. I will start by highlighting our research profile along with our mission. Then, I will walk you through our projects and contributions in the domains of the internet of things, visible light communication, underwater communication, and future 6G networks. I will focus on the challenges facing each project, highlight our solution methodology, and discuss some performance evaluation results. I will focus on our work on Aqua-Fi, which aims at bringing the Internet into the underwater environment. I will also focus on our recent project on the communication via breath.
Yasser Shalabi, Graduate Student, Computer Science, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Sunday, February 02, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2
The potential of indirect execution attacks – e.g. Return-Oriented-Programming and Transient-Execution based Side-channels – threaten all modern computing platforms. Standard security policies are unable to eliminate these threats. What is the role of hardware in mitigating these threats? Why are the latest processor designs no longer proactively eliminating threats? In this talk, we will explore these questions and reconsider the role of hardware in securing systems. I will present Record-and-Replay as a fundamental solution that can enable a hardware-software co-design that can strengthen the security of modern computing platforms.
Monday, January 27, 2020, 17:00
- 18:30
Building 1, Level 2, Room 2202
In this thesis, a variety of applications in computer vision and graphics of inverse problems using tomographic imaging modalities will be presented: (i) The first application focuses on the CT reconstruction with a specific emphasis on recovering thin 1D and 2D manifolds embedded in 3D volumes. (ii) The second application is about space-time tomography (iii) Base on the second application, the third one is aiming to improve the tomographic reconstruction of time-varying geometries undergoing faster, non-periodic deformations, by a warp-and-project strategy. Finally, with a physically plausible divergence-free prior for motion estimation, as  well as a novel  view synthesis technique,  we present applications to dynamic fluid imaging which further demonstrates the flexibility of our optimization frameworks
Prof. Nasir Memon, Vice Dean for Academics and Student Affairs and Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering
Monday, January 27, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
The emergence of “fake news” along with sophisticated techniques using machine learning to create realistic looking media such as deepfakes, has led to a renewed interest in digital media forensics. In this talk, Professor Nasir Memon will broadly discuss how media is generated and manipulations have been traditionally detected. He will then look at new approaches using machine learning for creating media that are leading us to a world where images and video cannot be believed any more as they can evade traditional detection techniques. Professor Memon will end by discussing approaches that are being developed to return integrity and trust in digital media.
Mohib Khan, Hesham Abouelmagd, Shijaz Abdulla (AWS)
Monday, January 27, 2020, 08:30
- 16:15
Building 19, Hall 1
The ML Hub, with the support of the AI Initiative, is excited to be hosting the AWS ML Immersion Day! Join us for a full-day immersion tutorial and hands-on lab on Amazon’s ML tools. The program includes an introduction to AWS AI and machine learning services and hands-on module on Amazon Lex and SageMaker. For details, please see the tutorial page on the ML Hub website. Registration is free but required. Please complete this form to register. Participants are encouraged to bring their fully-charged laptops and have a working Internet connection.
Prof. Nasir Memon, Vice Dean for Academics and Student Affairs and Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering
Sunday, January 26, 2020, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2
Contrary to the prevailing belief, we show that user authentication based on biometrics is vulnerable to dictionary attacks. We show the problem is particularly significant for partial prints used in smartphones and increasingly adopted for authentication tasks ranging from unlocking the devices screen up to payment authorization. We also show that speaker verification systems are also vulnerable to dictionary attacks. We then discuss ways to mitigate such attacks.
Monday, January 20, 2020, 08:00
- 17:00
Building 19, Level 2, Hall 1
Computational Bioscience Research Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology is pleased to announce the KAUST Research Conference on Digital Health 2020. To see the agenda of the conference Digital Health 2020 visit agenda page. To view ​frequently asked questions, visit FAQ page.
Prof. Jin Li, Computer Science, Guangzhou University
Wednesday, January 15, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214

Abstract

Nowadays, the devices in the Internet of Things have been widely used.

Faisal M. Almutairi, Ph.D. Candidate, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota
Wednesday, January 08, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
B1 L4 Room 4214
The proposed method, called PREMA, leverages low-rank tensor factorization tools to provide recovery guarantees under certain conditions. PREMA is flexible in the sense that it can perform the disaggregation task on data that have missing entries, i.e., partially observed. The proposed method considers challenging scenarios: i) the available views of the data are aggregated in two dimensions, i.e., double aggregation, and ii) the aggregation patterns are unknown. Experiments on real data from different domains, i.e., sales data from retail companies, crime counts, and weather observations, are presented to showcase the effectiveness of PREMA.
Prof. Chunhua Su, Computer Science, University of Aizu
Wednesday, January 01, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
B1 L4 Room 4214
In this talk, the speaker will provide a high-level introduction to his recent research on IoT endpoint security. Firstly, he will introduce requirements followed by a discussion on cryptographic algorithm implementation. He will mainly focus on an overview of efficient cryptography for IoT endpoints and system privacy issues. Then he will discuss security management approaches, positives, negatives and challenges to resolve, linking to the endpoint device security section with regards to realistic device needs/capabilities.
Wednesday, December 11, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
The SLATE (Software for Linear Algebra Targeting Exascale) library is being developed to provide fundamental dense linear algebra capabilities for current and upcoming distributed high-performance systems, both accelerated CPU–GPU based and CPU based.
Monday, December 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This talk will be a gentle introduction to proximal splitting algorithms to minimize a sum of possibly nonsmooth convex functions. Several such algorithms date back to the 60s, but the last 10 years have seen the development of new primal-dual splitting algorithms, motivated by the need to solve large-scale problems in signal and image processing, machine learning, and more generally data science. No background will be necessary to attend the talk, whose goal is to present the intuitions behind this class of methods.
Sunday, December 01, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
The talk will discuss how recent advances in wireless computing and communication nodes can be harnessed to serve the multitude of deployment scenarios required to empower communities of the future with smart and connected systems. In this talk, we address fundamental questions that should be asked when contemplating future smart and connected systems, namely, How, Where and What? (1) How can we design computing and communication nodes that best utilize resources in a way that is cognizant of both the abilities of the platform, as well as the requirements of the network? (2) Where are the nodes deployed? By understanding the context of deployment, one can architect unique solutions that are currently unimaginable. With the transformation to diverse applications such as body area networking, critical infrastructure monitoring, precision agriculture, autonomous driving, etc., the need for innovative solutions becomes even more amplified. (3) What benefit can be inferred from the data gathered by nodes in the capacity of computing, communication, and sensing?
Prof. Ben Zhao, Computer Science, University of Chicago, USA
Monday, November 25, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will describe two recent results on detecting and understanding backdoor attacks on deep learning systems. I will first present Neural Cleanse (IEEE S&P 2019), the first robust tool to detect a wide range of backdoors in deep learning models. We use the idea of perturbation distances between classification labels to detect when a backdoor trigger has created shortcuts to misclassification to a particular label.  Second, I will also summarize our new work on Latent Backdoors (CCS 2019), a stronger type of backdoor attack that is more difficult to detect and survives retraining in commonly used transfer learning systems. Latent backdoors are robust and stealthy, even against the latest detection tools (including neural cleanse).
Ahmed E. Kamal, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.
Sunday, November 24, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
B1, L3, Conference Room 3119
The European Telecom Standards Institute (ETSI) introduced the concept of Network Function Virtualization (NFV) with the aim of efficient network architecture and network system operation. In traditional networks, network functions are implemented in dedicated physical machines which are designed for single functionalities. Network services have been provided by connecting these physical machines, so the network architecture has been highly rigid and hard to change. NFV environment provides a more flexible and scalable network configuration and implementation through the softwarization of physical network functions. Network functions are transformed to Virtual Machines (VMs) so that Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) can be implemented in commodity servers built for common uses, including public clouds.
Dr. Joris van de Klundert, Professor of Operations Management, Prince Mohammad Bin Salman College (MBSC) of Business & Entrepreneurship
Monday, November 18, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This research formally models, analyzes and maximizes equity of transplant waiting times and probabilities using queuing theory and network flows, based on Rawls' theory of justice. The presented formal models address inequities resulting from blood type incompatibilities, which are interrelated to ethnic differences in patient and donor rates.
Monday, November 11, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Adil Salim is mainly interested in stochastic approximation, optimization, and machine learning. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Professor Peter Richtarik at the Visual Computing Center (VCC) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Dr. William Kleiber, Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado, USA
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
In this talk, we explore a graphical model representation for the stochastic coefficients relying on the specification of the sparse precision matrix. Sparsity is encouraged in an L1-penalized likelihood framework. Estimation exploits a majorization-minimization approach. The result is a flexible nonstationary spatial model that is adaptable to very large datasets.