Monday, August 26, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
The life sciences have invested significant resources in the development and application of semantic technologies to make research data accessible and interlinked, and to enable the integration and analysis of data. Utilizing the semantics associated with research data in data analysis approaches is often challenging. Now, novel methods are becoming available that combine symbolic methods and statistical methods in Artificial Intelligence. In my talk, I will describe how to apply knowledge-based methods for the analysis of biological and biomedical data, in particular identification of gene-disease associations and drug targets.
Dr. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor, Advanced Materials, Wiley
Tuesday, July 09, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
Materials science is a multidisciplinary field of research with many different scientists and engineers having various backgrounds active in it. The literature landscape consequently is populated currently by a wide range of journals which greatly differ in purpose, scope, quality, and readership. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor of Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional Materials, and Advanced Optical Materials, will track some of the most important developments and trends in the research field and the Advanced journals program. Last year, Advanced Materials reached an Impact Factor of 21.95 and received over 8,300 submissions – and Advanced Functional Materials over 9,200. Only around 15% of all those papers made it to publication in the journal, and this rate is similar for all other Advanced journals. So, what do editors do to select the very best papers, and what can authors do to optimize their chances of having their manuscripts accepted?
Prof. Liching Chiu, Graduate Program of Teaching Chinese as a Second Language (TCSL), National Taiwan University
Tuesday, July 02, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
This series of lectures guide students to the preparation and analysis of a well-organized abstract. We will discuss the proper language (tense, voice, and person) for abstract writing, and learn how to meet the purposes of different abstracts. Finally, students will have a chance to compose and evaluate their writing. Topics: Overview of abstract writing; Conference abstract journal abstract; Organization of an abstract; Language conventions of abstract writing; Disciplinary abstract analysis; Frequent mistakes of abstract writing.
Tong Zhang, Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, HKUST
Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Hall 1
Many problems in machine learning rely on statistics and optimization. To solve these problems, new techniques are needed. I will show some of these new techniques through selected machine learning problems I have recently worked on, such as nonconvex stochastic optimization, distributed training, adversarial attack, and generative models.
Muhamad Felemban, Assistant Professor, Computer Engineering Department, KFUPM
Monday, May 13, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 1
With the growing cyber-security threats to governmental and organizational infrastructures, the need to develop high resilient systems that preserve the security and privacy of data is becoming increasingly important. Although there is a large body of work on security and privacy countermeasures, cyber-attacks still persist. A prominent type of such attacks is intrusion attack that aims at data tampering, which can impair the availability and the integrity of data.
Alp Yurtsever, PhD Candidate, EPFL
Monday, May 06, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 2
With the ever-growing data sizes along with the increasing complexity of the modern problem formulations, there is a recent trend where heuristic approaches with unverifiable assumptions are overtaking more rigorous, conventional optimization methods at the expense of robustness. This trend can be overturned when we exploit dimensionality reduction at the core of optimization. I contend that even the classical convex optimization did not reach yet its limits of scalability.
Prof. Guandong Xu, School of Software and Advanced Analytics Institute, University of Technology Sydney
Tuesday, April 30, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
B1 L4 Room 4214
Knowledge Graph (KG) is a large-scale semantic network consisting of entities/concepts as well as the semantic relationships among them, which could be considered as a concise version of Semantic Web. Recently KG is emerging as a hot topic of knowledge discovery and management under artificial intelligence, facilitating semantic computing. Causal relation is a reflection of user behaviours with backend intention, which is related another emerging hot topic – recommendation interpretability. This talk will cover the recent research progresses in these two areas and highlight some open research challenges in recommender systems.
Prof. Xavier Bresson, Data Science and AI Research Centre at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Singapore
Thursday, April 25, 2019, 09:00
- 17:00
Auditorium 0215 (between Bldg. 4 and 5)
The ML Hub offers a 2-day short course on deep learning and the latest algorithms in artificial intelligence. The course will be given by Professor Xavier Bresson from the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, who is a leading researcher in the field of deep learning. The course will include the theory of deep learning techniques as well as practical exercises. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of linear algebra (e.g. matrix multiplication) and script programming (e.g. Python, Matlab, R) are needed. The coding will be done in Python. Note, that this course has limited seating and filling registration form does not guarantee acceptance. If you are selected, you will receive a confirmation e-mail.
Associate Professor Edmond Chow, School of Computational Science and Engineering, College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology
Wednesday, April 24, 2019, 14:00
- 15:30
BW Bldg 2 and 3 Auditorium 0215
This talk begins with an introduction to quantum chemistry for HPC researchers.  We discuss the main computational kernels, how their performance is limited by various bottlenecks, and algorithms and implementations that improve performance.  One particular kernel is the calculation of the Coulomb matrix.  Whereas the fast multipole method (FMM) can be used to rapidly compute the Coulomb potential for sets of point charges, continuous variants of FMM were developed in the 1990s for sets of charge distributions that arise in quantum chemistry.
Prof. Xavier Bresson, Data Science and AI Research Centre at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Singapore
Wednesday, April 24, 2019, 09:00
- 17:00
Auditorium 0215 (between Bldg. 4 and 5)
The ML Hub offers a 2-day short course on deep learning and the latest algorithms in artificial intelligence. The course will be given by Professor Xavier Bresson from the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, who is a leading researcher in the field of deep learning. The course will include the theory of deep learning techniques as well as practical exercises. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of linear algebra (e.g. matrix multiplication) and script programming (e.g. Python, Matlab, R) are needed. The coding will be done in Python. Note, that this course has limited seating and filling registration form does not guarantee acceptance. If you are selected, you will receive a confirmation e-mail.
Tuesday, April 23, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
B3, L5, Room 5209
This dissertation describes detailed performance engineering and optimization of an unstructured computational aerodynamics software system with irregular memory accesses on a wide variety of multi- and many-core emerging high-performance computing scalable architectures, which are expected to be the building blocks of energy-austere exascale systems, and on which algorithmic- and architecture-oriented optimizations are essential for achieving worthy performance.
Prof. Xavier Bresson, NTU, Singapore
Tuesday, April 23, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9, Hall 2
In the past years, deep learning methods have achieved unprecedented performance on a broad range of problems in various fields from computer vision to speech recognition. So far research has mainly focused on developing deep learning methods for grid-structured data, while many important applications have to deal with graph-structured data.
Prof. Yannis Manolopoulos, Open Univ. of Cyprus
Monday, April 22, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 1
During the past two decades the availability of big scholarly data repositories such as Google Scholar, Elsevier Scopus offered tremendous opportunities to analyze scientific production and help develop models for it. The development of computerized analysis methods for these voluminous scholarly data allows to understand, quantify and predict research activities and the corresponding outcomes. The focus of this talk is on techniques to forecast future impact of a scientist; this is a very interesting problem because it allows for making effective hiring/promotion decisions and research fund allocation, among others.
Dr. Van Tien Nguyen, NYU Abu Dhabi
Sunday, April 21, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B3 L5 Rm 5220
Many central problems in geometry, mathematical physics and biology reduce to questions regarding the behavior of solutions of nonlinear evolution equations. The global dynamical behavior of bounded solutions for large times is of significant interest. However, in many real situations, solutions develop singularities in finite time. The singularities have to be analyzed in detail before attempting to extend solutions beyond their singularities or to understand their geometry in conjunction with globally bounded solutions. In this context we have been particularly interested in qualitative descriptions of blowup.
Prof. Xiaoru Yuan, Peking University
Monday, April 15, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Hall 1
In this talk, I will introduce a few recent works on tree visualization. First I will present a  visualization technique for comparing topological structures and node attribute values of multiple trees. I will further introduce GoTree, a declarative grammar supporting the creation of a wide range of tree visualizations. In the application side, visualization and visual analytics on social media  will be introduced. The data from social media can be considered as graphs or trees with complex attributes. A few approaches using map metaphor for social media data visualization will be discussed.
Prof. Alexander I. Bobenko, Technische Universität Berlin
Wednesday, April 03, 2019, 13:15
- 14:45
B9 L2 Lecture Hall 2

How is modern mathematical teamwork carried out? The multiple award-winning film The Discrete Charm of Geometry by Ekaterina Eremenko will screen on April 3rd after the CEMSE Dean's Distinguished Lecture Discrete conformal mappings and Riemann Surfaces: Theory and Applications by Prof. Alexander I. Bobenko, Technische Universität Berlin. Following the screening, Prof. Bobenko will be available for a Q&A session.

Prof. Alexander I. Bobenko, Technische Universität Berlin
Wednesday, April 03, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B9 L2 Lecture Hall 2
The general idea of discrete differential geometry is to find and investigate discrete models that exhibit properties and structures characterisitic of the corresponding smooth geometric objects. This is a challenging problem, since equivalent points of view in the smooth setting may lead to a number of inequivalent treatments in the discrete setting. We will illustrate the paradigm of structure-preserving discretizations on the example of conformal maps by showing how simple definitions lead to surprisingly rich theories.
Fenglong Ma, Research Assistant, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA
Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
B1 L4 Room 4214
There is an increasing growth in the amount of electronic health records (EHRs) being collected by healthcare facilities. Data mining techniques hold great potential to systematically use such data for identifying not only inefficiencies but also best practices that improve care and reduce costs. However, due to the complexity of EHR data, directly applying traditional machine learning techniques may yield unsatisfactory predictive performance. Recent advances in deep learning-based methods provide unprecedented ability to predict patients’ future health status, but they still suffer from the sparsity issue of EHR data.
Andrea Morello, Scientia Professor of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW Sydney
Sunday, March 24, 2019, 09:00
- 17:00
Building 19, Level 3, Conference Hall 1
With the end of the Moore’s law, it became imperative to find new principles for computing that can avoid the current physical limitations. Among the promising approaches is Quantum Computing which has resulted in substantial national investments in research and development in this area by many nations. This first tutorial is designed to target scientists, engineers and mathematicians who are interested in this rapidly growing field but have not yet invested enough time in learning about it.