The “KAUST Research Conference on New Trends in Biosensors and Bioelectronics” was held in KAUST between the 25th and 27th of February. This yearly event aims to give an overview of the most recent efforts in bioelectronics that tackle the “interface” problem and overcome the limits of the current technologies by generating new materials/architectures/device components.

KAUST master's degree student José Ilton de Oliveira Filho recently won first place at the second edition of the IEEE International Sensors and Measurement Systems Student Contest (IEEE IS&M-SC). IEEE IS&M-SC is a global competition directed at teams of advanced undergraduates, master's degree and Ph.D. students and seeks to stimulate creative ideas for sensor and measuring systems applications.
"You would not believe how many amazingly talented people there are in the world, but they often are just not exposed to opportunities," noted Muhammad Mustafa Hussain, KAUST professor of electrical engineering and currently a visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He is determined to try and change this—one step at a time.

Accurate indoor positioning has the potential to transform the way people navigate indoors similar to the way the GPS transformed outdoor navigation. Over the last 20 years, many indoor positioning technologies have been proposed and experimented by both academia and industry.

A Professor of Marine Science at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) has received the 2019 Ramon Margalef Prize in Ecology from the Generalitat of Catalonia. The international jury of the Ramon Margalef Prize has distinguished Professor Carlos Duarte as a world leader in marine ecology and biological oceanography, for his research into 'blue carbon.' His findings have been adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and are considered a fundamental contribution to mitigate the effects of Global Warming on our planet.
An international team of over 150 scientists from 26 countries have collated movement data from nearly 2,000 sharks tracked with satellite transmitter tags. The groundbreaking study, published in the journal Nature reports, revealed that even the remotest parts of the ocean appear to offer highly migratory sharks little refuge from industrialised fishing fleets.