Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Thursday, November 07, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Prof. William Kleiber, Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado, USA
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
In this talk, we explore a graphical model representation for the stochastic coefficients relying on the specification of the sparse precision matrix. Sparsity is encouraged in an L1-penalized likelihood framework. Estimation exploits a majorization-minimization approach. The result is a flexible nonstationary spatial model that is adaptable to very large datasets.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday, November 04, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
TBD

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Registration is mandatory and will determine the time of the workshop (i) 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM or (ii) 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. To register please click here.

Pieter Barendrecht, PhD Student, Computer Science, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Thursday, October 24, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214

Abstract

There are many intriguing aspects and applications of splines, i

Sunday, September 15, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Wave functional materials are artificial materials that can control wave propagation as wished. In this talk, I will give a brief review of the progress of wave functional materials and reveal the secret behind the engineering of these materials to achieve desired properties.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Lecture Hall 1
We focus on the theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of classical wave propagation in complex systems, such as periodic structures and random media.  In this talk, I will give an overview of the research conducted in our group by emphasizing on three major aspects:  numerical method, homogenization, and applications in artificial materials.
Professor Rajesh Rajamani, Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota
Sunday, September 01, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 2, Room 4214
A number of exciting vehicle automation and active safety systems are being developed by research groups around the world.  This talk focuses on novel sensors, estimation algorithms and control systems that can fill critical gaps in the automation technologies under development. The first part of this seminar describes interesting sensing and estimation solutions that can significantly improve the effectiveness of active safety systems. The second part of the seminar describes the development of a new class of narrow commuter vehicles designed to address traffic congestion, improve highway mobility and provide very high fuel economy. The final part of the seminar describes the development of a smart bicycle with instrumentation that can track trajectories of nearby vehicles on the road and provide warnings to the motorist, if a potential car-bicycle collision is detected.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Wednesday, July 31, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tuesday, July 30, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Monday, July 29, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.
Dr. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor, Advanced Materials, Wiley
Tuesday, July 09, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
Materials science is a multidisciplinary field of research with many different scientists and engineers having various backgrounds active in it. The literature landscape consequently is populated currently by a wide range of journals which greatly differ in purpose, scope, quality, and readership. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor of Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional Materials, and Advanced Optical Materials, will track some of the most important developments and trends in the research field and the Advanced journals program. Last year, Advanced Materials reached an Impact Factor of 21.95 and received over 8,300 submissions – and Advanced Functional Materials over 9,200. Only around 15% of all those papers made it to publication in the journal, and this rate is similar for all other Advanced journals. So, what do editors do to select the very best papers, and what can authors do to optimize their chances of having their manuscripts accepted?
Prof. Liching Chiu, Graduate Program of Teaching Chinese as a Second Language (TCSL), National Taiwan University
Tuesday, July 02, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
This series of lectures guide students to the preparation and analysis of a well-organized abstract. We will discuss the proper language (tense, voice, and person) for abstract writing, and learn how to meet the purposes of different abstracts. Finally, students will have a chance to compose and evaluate their writing. Topics: Overview of abstract writing; Conference abstract journal abstract; Organization of an abstract; Language conventions of abstract writing; Disciplinary abstract analysis; Frequent mistakes of abstract writing.
Prof. Liang Feng, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania
Thursday, May 30, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
B1 L2 Room 4214
Quantum mechanics and photonics share mathematical equivalence. By carefully exploiting the interplay between optical index, gain and loss in the complex dielectric permittivity plane, optics has become an ideal platform to explore some exotic quantum concepts, such as topological physics and parity-time (PT) symmetry. Instead of counteracting optical losses at micro and nano scales in integrated photonics, we started from an opposite viewpoint and developed a new paradigm of positively and strategically manipulating optical losses by the quantum-inspired photonics concept enrich fundamental optical physics and realized novel photonic synthetic matters with unique optical functionalities. In this seminar, I will present our recent efforts on engineering the complex optical potentials at an exceptional point (i.e. PT symmetry transition point). Based on the exceptional point-induced unidirectionality, we harness optical losses to enable unique microlaser functionalities, in particular, an orbital angular momentum (OAM) microlaser that structures and twists the lasing radiation at the microscale, which is expected to address the growing demand for information capacity. Additionally, I will discuss non-Hermitian topological photonics where optical non-Hermiticity and topological physics are coupled.
Professor Ritesh Agarwal, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania
Thursday, May 30, 2019, 09:00
- 10:00
B1 L2 Room 4214
Strongly confined electrical, optical and thermal excitations drastically modify material’s properties and break local symmetries that can enable precisely tunable novel responses and new functionalities. We will discuss the effect of engineered plasmonic lattice on light matter interactions in 2D excitonic crystals to produce novel responses such as enhanced and tunable emission, Fano resonances and strong exciton-plasmon polaritons, which can be precisely controlled by geometry and applied fields to produce novel device concepts. Our recent work on collective polaritonic modes and the formation of a complete polaritonic bandgap in few-layered excitonic semiconductors coupled to plasmons will also be presented.
Prof. Nicola Fusco, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 15:30
- 17:00
B1 L4 room 4102
The aim of the course is to give a self contained introduction, at the level of a graduate course, to the stability of the isoperimetric inequality and other related geometric and functional inequality such as the Sobolev inequality, the Faber-Krahn and the Brunn-Minkowski inequality.  Lecture 4: I will discuss the quantitative isoperimetric inequality in the general case and the quantitative form of related geometric and functional inequalities.
Tuesday, May 28, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Mean-field games MFG are models of large populations of rational agents who seek to optimize an objective function that takes into account their state variables and the distribution of the state variable of the remaining agents. MFG with congestion model problems where the agents’ motion is hampered in high-density regions. First, we study radial solutions for first- and second-order stationary MFG with congestion on R^d. Next, we consider second-order stationary MFG with congestion and prove the existence of stationary solutions. Additionally, we study first-order stationary MFG with congestion with quadratic or power-like Hamiltonians.