Monday, December 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This talk will be a gentle introduction to proximal splitting algorithms to minimize a sum of possibly nonsmooth convex functions. Several such algorithms date back to the 60s, but the last 10 years have seen the development of new primal-dual splitting algorithms, motivated by the need to solve large-scale problems in signal and image processing, machine learning, and more generally data science. No background will be necessary to attend the talk, whose goal is to present the intuitions behind this class of methods.
Sunday, December 01, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
The talk will discuss how recent advances in wireless computing and communication nodes can be harnessed to serve the multitude of deployment scenarios required to empower communities of the future with smart and connected systems. In this talk, we address fundamental questions that should be asked when contemplating future smart and connected systems, namely, How, Where and What? (1) How can we design computing and communication nodes that best utilize resources in a way that is cognizant of both the abilities of the platform, as well as the requirements of the network? (2) Where are the nodes deployed? By understanding the context of deployment, one can architect unique solutions that are currently unimaginable. With the transformation to diverse applications such as body area networking, critical infrastructure monitoring, precision agriculture, autonomous driving, etc., the need for innovative solutions becomes even more amplified. (3) What benefit can be inferred from the data gathered by nodes in the capacity of computing, communication, and sensing?
Prof. Ben Zhao, Computer Science, University of Chicago, USA
Monday, November 25, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
In this talk, I will describe two recent results on detecting and understanding backdoor attacks on deep learning systems. I will first present Neural Cleanse (IEEE S&P 2019), the first robust tool to detect a wide range of backdoors in deep learning models. We use the idea of perturbation distances between classification labels to detect when a backdoor trigger has created shortcuts to misclassification to a particular label.  Second, I will also summarize our new work on Latent Backdoors (CCS 2019), a stronger type of backdoor attack that is more difficult to detect and survives retraining in commonly used transfer learning systems. Latent backdoors are robust and stealthy, even against the latest detection tools (including neural cleanse).
Thursday, November 21, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
I will present an overview of our activities around estimation problems for partial and fractional differential equations. I will present the methods and the algorithms we develop for the state, source and parameters estimation and illustrate the results with some simulations and real applications.
Dr. Joris van de Klundert, Professor of Operations Management, Prince Mohammad Bin Salman College (MBSC) of Business & Entrepreneurship
Monday, November 18, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
This research formally models, analyzes and maximizes equity of transplant waiting times and probabilities using queuing theory and network flows, based on Rawls' theory of justice. The presented formal models address inequities resulting from blood type incompatibilities, which are interrelated to ethnic differences in patient and donor rates.
Prof. David Bolin, Statistics, KAUST
Thursday, November 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
The talk will give an overview of some recent developments of statistical models based on stochastic partial differential equations. We will in particular focus on equations with non-local differential operators or non-Gaussian driving noise, and explain when any why such models are useful. As motivating applications, analysis of longitudinal medical data and ocean waves will be considered.
Prof. David L. Donoho, Department of Statistics, Stanford University
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 15:00
- 16:00
Building 19, MOSTI Auditorium
We consider the problem of recovering a low-rank signal matrix in the presence of a general, unknown additive noise; more specifically, noise where the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix have a general bulk distribution. We assume given an upper bound for the rank of the assumed orthogonally invariant signal, and develop a selector for hard thresholding of singular values, which adapts to the unknown correlation structure of the noise.
Prof. David L. Donoho, Department of Statistics, Stanford University
Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325
A variety of intriguing patterns in eigenvalues were observed and speculated about in ML conference papers. We describe the work of Vardan Papyan showing that the traditional subdisciplines, properly deployed, can offer insights about these objects that ML researchers had.
Monday, November 11, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Adil Salim is mainly interested in stochastic approximation, optimization, and machine learning. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Professor Peter Richtarik at the Visual Computing Center (VCC) at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Wednesday, November 06, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Dr. William Kleiber, Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado, USA
Tuesday, November 05, 2019, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
In this talk, we explore a graphical model representation for the stochastic coefficients relying on the specification of the sparse precision matrix. Sparsity is encouraged in an L1-penalized likelihood framework. Estimation exploits a majorization-minimization approach. The result is a flexible nonstationary spatial model that is adaptable to very large datasets.
Roy Maxion, Research Professor, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday, November 04, 2019, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223

Roy Maxion will give three lectures focusing broadly on different aspects of an increasingly important topic: reproducibility. Reproducibility tests the reliability of an experimental result and is one of the foundations of the entire scientific enterprise.

We often hear that certain foods are good for you, and a few years later we learn that they're not. A series of results in cancer research was examined to see if they were reproducible. A startling number of them - 47 out of 53 - were not. Matters of reproducibility are now cropping up in computer science, and given the importance of computing in the world, it's essential that our own results are reproducible -- perhaps especially the ones based on complex models or data sets, and artificial intelligence or machine learning. This lecture series will expose attendees to several issues in ensuring reproducibility, with the goal of teaching students (and others) some of the crucial aspects of making their own science reproducible. Hint: it goes much farther than merely making your data available to the public.

Sunday, September 15, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Wave functional materials are artificial materials that can control wave propagation as wished. In this talk, I will give a brief review of the progress of wave functional materials and reveal the secret behind the engineering of these materials to achieve desired properties.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Lecture Hall 1
We focus on the theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of classical wave propagation in complex systems, such as periodic structures and random media.  In this talk, I will give an overview of the research conducted in our group by emphasizing on three major aspects:  numerical method, homogenization, and applications in artificial materials.
Professor Rajesh Rajamani, Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota
Sunday, September 01, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 2, Room 4214
A number of exciting vehicle automation and active safety systems are being developed by research groups around the world.  This talk focuses on novel sensors, estimation algorithms and control systems that can fill critical gaps in the automation technologies under development. The first part of this seminar describes interesting sensing and estimation solutions that can significantly improve the effectiveness of active safety systems. The second part of the seminar describes the development of a new class of narrow commuter vehicles designed to address traffic congestion, improve highway mobility and provide very high fuel economy. The final part of the seminar describes the development of a smart bicycle with instrumentation that can track trajectories of nearby vehicles on the road and provide warnings to the motorist, if a potential car-bicycle collision is detected.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Wednesday, July 31, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.
Professor Mamadou L. Diagne, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tuesday, July 30, 2019, 10:30
- 15:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3131
Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are often used to model various complex physical systems. Representative engineering applications such as heat exchangers, transmission lines, oil wells, road traffic, multiphase flow, melting phenomena, supply chains, collective dynamics, and even chemical processes governing the state of charge of Lithium-ion battery, extrusion, reactors to mention a few. Generally, key aspects of these processes operating mode are driven by convection phenomena with a spatiotemporal dynamic that cannot be approximated straightforwardly using a finite-dimensional representation. This course will explore the boundary control of several class of PDEs via the well-known backstepping method.