Sunday, October 20, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Semiconductors are pervasive in consumer electronics and optoelectronics, and the related optical devices are deemed disruptive that Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014 was awarded to the inventors of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which “has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources”. While AlInGaN-based lasers and LEDs, and silicon-based photodetectors are currently matured, unconventional usage based on the materials has demonstrated their further potential, including solar-hydrogen generation, indoor-horticulture, and high-speed communication.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 9, Level 3, Room 3223
This talk will try to clarify some misconceptions about what digital health (DH) is, and what it should not be.
Prof. Paulo Esteves-Veríssimo, University of Luxembourg, SnT, CritiX
Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325
Computing and communications infrastructures have become commodities that transact huge quantities of data and are pervasively interconnected, inside countries, and worldwide. Modern societies largely depend on them.
Monday, October 14, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Existing RDF engines are designed for specific hardware architectures; porting to a different architecture (e.g., GPUs) entails enormous implementation effort. We explore sparse matrix algebra as an alternative for designing a portable, scalable and efficient RDF engine.
Dr. Yunhai Wang, Professor, Computer Science, Shandong University, China
Wednesday, October 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 2, Room 2325

Abstract

By providing visual representations

Dr. Marc Dacier, Chair of the Digital Security department and a full Professor at Eurecom, France
Monday, September 30, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Thursday, September 26, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Extreme environmental events such as droughts, floods and heat-waves take place in space and time, and it is necessary to take this into account when evaluating their risks and estimating their probabilities.  During this seminar, I will review some classical and more recent work on this topic, focusing on the modeling of univariate and spatial extremes. The ideas will be illustrated by applications to peak river flow data from the UK, and heavy rainfall close to Jeddah.
Dr. Ciril Bohak, Postdoctoral Researcher, Faculty of Computer and Information Science, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Wednesday, September 25, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
Building 1, Level 2, VCC Lecture Room
Dr. Suhaib Fahmy, Associate Professor, Computer Engineering, University of Warwick, UK
Tuesday, September 24, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Auditorium 0215 (between Buildings 2 & 3)
Dr. Paul Anthony Haigh,Lecturer in Communications, Intelligent Sensing and Communications Group,Newcastle University
Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
B2 L5 Room 5220

Abstract

Visible light communications (VLC) is a hot topic in internet access networks, developing

Sunday, September 15, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Wave functional materials are artificial materials that can control wave propagation as wished. In this talk, I will give a brief review of the progress of wave functional materials and reveal the secret behind the engineering of these materials to achieve desired properties.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Lecture Hall 1
We focus on the theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of classical wave propagation in complex systems, such as periodic structures and random media.  In this talk, I will give an overview of the research conducted in our group by emphasizing on three major aspects:  numerical method, homogenization, and applications in artificial materials.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 09:30
- 11:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
This thesis aims to investigate the microscopic characteristics of the nanowires and expand on the possibility of using transparent amorphous substrate for III-nitride nanowire devices. In this work, we performed material growth, characterization, and device fabrication of III-nitride nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy on unconventional substrates including silicon substrates and fused silica substrates. We also investigated the effect of various nucleation layers on the morphology and quality of the nanowires.
Dr. Xiuxian Li, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Monday, September 09, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
This talk is concerned with the problem of seeking a common fixed point for a finite collection of nonexpansive operators over time-varying multi-agent networks in real Hilbert spaces. Each operator is assumed to be only privately and approximately known to each individual agent, and all agents need to cooperate to solve this problem by local communications over time-varying networks. To handle this problem, inspired by the centralized inexact Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (IKM) iteration, two distributed algorithms, called distributed inexact Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (D-IKM) iteration and distributed inexact block-coordinate Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (D-IBKM) iteration, are proposed. It is shown that the two algorithms can converge weakly to a common fixed point of the family of nonexpansive operators.
Sunday, September 08, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322
This talk provides an overview of the latest laser-based lighting and Gbit/s VLC and underwater communications. Recent progress of visible wavelength high-speed transmitters and receivers will also be discussed.
Christian Claudel, Assistant Professor, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at UT-Austin
Wednesday, September 04, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 5, Level 5, Room 5209

Abstract

Flash floods are one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, causing thousands of

Monday, September 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
In this talk, I will first give an overview of the research activities in Structural and Functional Bioinformatics Group (http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa). I will then focus on our efforts on developing computational methods to tackle key open problems in Nanopore sequencing. In particular, I will introduce our recent works on developing a collection of computational methods to decode raw electrical current signal sequences into DNA sequences, to simulate raw signals of Nanopore, and to efficiently and accurately align electrical current signal sequences with DNA sequences. Then, I will further introduce their applications in clinical and environmental fields.