Xingyu Liu, Postdoc, CMU
Tuesday, April 16, 2024, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 9, Level 4, Room 4225
Contact Person
The robotics industry has manufactured multiple successful robots that are deployed in various domains and have been playing a significant role in the modern economy.
Monday, April 15, 2024, 11:30
- 12:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Despite being small and simple structured in comparison to their victims, virus particles have the potential to harm severly and even kill highly developed species such as humans. To face upcoming virus pandemics, detailed quantitative biophysical un- derstanding of intracellular virus replication mechanisms is crucial. Unveiling the relationship of form and function will allow to determine putative attack points relevant for the systematic development of direct antiviral agents (DAA) and potent vacci- nes. Biophysical investigations of spatio-temporal dynamics of intracellular virus replication so far are rare.
Sunday, April 14, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
This talk will provide a recent topic of the III-nitride-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The InGaN-based blue LEDs are very contributed to energy-saving for light sources all over the world. Therefore, the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to the inventors of blue LEDs.
Thursday, April 04, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325, Hall 2
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Predicting the paths of animals poses a significant challenge, given the intricate nature of their behaviors, the impact of unpredictable environmental elements, individual differences, and the scarcity of precise data on their movements.
Tuesday, April 02, 2024, 15:30
- 17:30
Building 9, Lecture Hall 1, R-2322
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The AI Initiative, Electrical, and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division are delighted to a

Monday, April 01, 2024, 11:30
- 12:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
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Computational imaging systems are based on the joint design of optics and associated image reconstruction algorithms. Of particular interest in recent years has been the development of end-to-end learned “Deep Optics” systems that use differentiable optical simulation in combination with backpropagation to simultaneously learn optical design and deep network post-processing for applications such as hyperspectral imaging, HDR, or extended depth of field. In this talk I will in particular focus on new developments that expand the design space of such systems from simple DOE optics to compound refractive optics and mixtures of different types of optical components.
Sunday, March 31, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
The traditional trajectory of electronic device scaling, guided by Moore's law, is currently encountering physical limitations. To address this, the "More-than-Moore" (MtM) trend has emerged, emphasizing the diversification of device functionalities to include sensing, storing, and processing data.
Thursday, March 28, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325, Hall 2
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As more and more modern time series data sets are becoming high dimensional, the problem of classification in this context has received increasing attention. We propose a statistical framework for classifying multivariate stationary Gaussian time series where the number of covariates, the length of the series, and the sample size, all grow to infinity.
Prof. Edgard Pimentel, Department of Mathematics of the University of Coimbra
Tuesday, March 26, 2024, 16:00
- 17:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
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Hessian-dependent functionals play a pivotal role in a wide latitude of problems in mathematics. Arising in the context of differential geometry and probability theory, this class of problems find applications in the mechanics of deformable media (mostly in elasticity theory) and the modelling of slow viscous fluids. We study such functionals from three distinct perspectives.
Fajri Koto, Postdoc, MBZUAI
Tuesday, March 26, 2024, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 9, Level 4, Room 4225
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Democratizing NLP across numerous languages is a non-trivial task, as it may encounter challenges related to data scarcity, limitations in computational resources, and the intricacies of multilingual and multicultural diversity. The speaker will discuss the efforts and findings in tackling these challenges in this talk. To begin, data scarcity and inconsistency in metadata present common obstacles in low-resource NLP, complicating the understanding of the NLP landscape for low-resource languages.
Wei Bai, Principal Software Research Architect, NVIDIA
Monday, March 25, 2024, 11:30
- 12:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
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Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) has long been recognized as a powerful technology for high-performance computing and data-intensive applications. In this talk, I will present our experience in deploying intra-region RDMA to support storage workloads in Azure.
Sunday, March 24, 2024, 15:00
- 17:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person
The emergence of large language models in text generation has markedly transformed our technological environment, significantly impacting our daily digital interactions.
Dr. Mohammad Vaseem and Dr. Sakandar Rauf, Electrical and Computer Engineering, KAUST
Sunday, March 24, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
The graduate seminar planned for March 24, from 12:00 to 13:00, has been canceled.
Sunday, March 24, 2024, 12:00
- 13:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
The electric grid is the backbone of our society and economy. It powers our homes, businesses, and transportation systems. With the advances in technology and the increasing use of renewables, the 3D era (decarbonization, decentralization, digitization) of power systems is facing new challenges. I will discuss how such challenges drive power grid evolution and how the temporal fluctuations of renewable sources impact the grid’s vulnerability. I will also provide methods how we are addressing these threats to ensure that the grid remains secure and resilient. I will conclude my talk with a brief description of my future research plans and a few slides about my research supervision, teaching activities, and visibility of my research group.
Thursday, March 21, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325, Hall 2
Contact Person
In this work, we employ importance sampling (IS) techniques to track a small over-threshold probability of a running maximum associated with the solution of a stochastic differential equation (SDE) within the framework of ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF).
Tuesday, March 19, 2024, 16:00
- 17:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Artificial materials represent composite media that can be meticulously engineered to exhibit unique wave propagation behaviors. Our research endeavors are driven by the intriguing principles underlying these materials, such as effective models, and their broad applications, including perfect absorption. In this presentation, I will outline our recent advancements in our innovative design strategies for novel artificial materials from both forward first-principle physics-based modeling and data-driven approaches. Specifically, I will highlight our pioneering work in the designs of double-zero-index materials for both electromagnetic and acoustic waves. Additionally, I will discuss our discovery of the acoustic Purcell effect for enhanced emission, as well as our development of analytic and numerical solutions for space-time modulated wave systems. Furthermore, I will delve into our practical solution for achieving broad frequency cloaking of invisibility. These accomplishments hold significant promise for a wide range of applications spanning sound control, communication, sensing, imaging and more.
Marios Kogias, Assistant Professor, Computing Department, Imperial College, London
Monday, March 18, 2024, 11:30
- 12:30
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Datacenters are the cornerstone of our digital lives since they can be viewed as just the other end of our smartphones. From an infrastructure point of view, although they started as a scale-out exercise for commodity off-the-shelf hardware, over the last years we are observing a shift from that paradigm with the emergence of increasingly fast network and storage IO devices, programmable accelerators, and new fast interconnects.
Yury Dvorkin, Associate Professor, Departments of Civil and Systems Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Sunday, March 17, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
B9, L2, R2325
Contact Person
Advances in uncertainty quantification enable more nuanced exploration of decision-making under risk in complex environments.
Tuesday, March 12, 2024, 15:30
- 17:30
B9, LH1, R2322
Contact Person
The seminars will be delivered in person by Jürgen Schmidhuber, Director of the KAUST AI Initiative, and will run weekly during the spring semester. The program will start with aspects of the theory of computation and delve into many topics not typically covered in a deep learning course. This is a truly unique opportunity to learn from one of the founders in artificial intelligence.
Fabio Credali, Postdoc at IMATI, Pavia
Tuesday, March 12, 2024, 14:30
- 15:30
B1, L4, seaside, R4214
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In 2019, diabetes caused 1.5 million global deaths, with 48% occurring before age 70. While Type 1 diabetes strongly depends on genetic components and is usually diagnosed in childhood, Type 2 diabetes is primarily caused by long term consumption of high calories foods. Lifestyle choices significantly influence the risk of Type 2 diabetes and obesity, including energy intake, diet composition, physical activity, and smoking.
Monday, March 11, 2024, 11:30
- 12:30
B9, L2, R2325
Contact Person
To protect privacy of training data for deep learning models, one line of work proposes to use Differential Privacy (DP). Over recent years, a substantial body of research has emerged, proposing a diverse array of differentially private training algorithms tailored to various deep learning models.
Prof. Ahmed Kishk, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
Sunday, March 10, 2024, 12:00
- 13:00
B9, L2, R2325, LH2
Contact Person
Traditional guiding structures and microwave packaging have limitations regarding losses or physical realization. Therefore, there is a need for efficient millimeter-wave guiding structures that overcome such limitations. Gap waveguide technology is found to overcome such limitations at millimeter-wave bands. Interest in such technology is increasing.
Reader, the Department of Computer Science, City, University of London.
Thursday, March 07, 2024, 15:30
- 16:30
Building 4, Level 5, Room 5209
Contact Person

 

Abstract

The talk will give an overview of research at the Department of Computer