Khaled Alshehri, Assistant Professor, KFUPM
Thursday, June 04, 2020, 13:00
- 14:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94745258090
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As end-consumers of electricity become more proactive and as many countries around the world push for a deeper penetration of renewable resources into the power grid, critical issues and challenges arise to the design and operation of deregulated electricity markets. In this presentation, we show how one can exploit tools from game theory to address some of these critical issues. Firstly, wholesale and retail markets are becoming more integrated due to the increasing adoption of distributed energy resources, creating a large gap in the current understanding of the impact of such small-scale energy resources on the larger power system operation and electricity market outcomes. This motivates us to develop a metric, called the Price of Aggregation, which quantifies the impact of integrating distributed energy resources in the retail-level on wholesale market efficiency.  Secondly, evidence from real markets indicate that large-scale adoption of wind energy in the transmission system leads to significantly higher price volatility in wholesale markets. To mitigate the effects of price volatility, we propose an add-on centralized clearing mechanism that is applicable to any wholesale market, with the aim of allowing any market participant to hedge against profit volatilities, without changing the existing market operations. Finally, we develop a multiperiod-multicompany demand response framework in retail markets, which captures the behavior of competing companies and their price-responsive end-consumers. Using real-life data, we demonstrate potential savings that can exceed 30% for end-consumers, in addition to revealing desirable mathematical properties and deep insights.
Prof Hieu Nguyen, Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Friday, May 29, 2020, 18:00
- 19:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98892204873
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Prof. Hieu Nguyen received the B.S. degree in Physics from Vietnam National University in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam (2005), the M.S. degree in Electronics Engineering from Ajou University, South Korea (2009), and the PhD. degree in Electrical Engineering from McGill University, Canada (2012). In September 2014, he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology. He has authored/co-authored 1 book chapter, 1 patent, 48 journal articles, and more than 70 conference presentations.
Thursday, May 28, 2020, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99582916945
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One of the main goals in computer vision is to achieve a human-like understanding of images. This understanding has been recently represented in various forms, including image classification, object detection, semantic segmentation, among many others. Nevertheless, image understanding has been mainly studied in the 2D image frame, so more information is needed to relate them to the 3D world. With the emergence of 3D sensors (e.g. the Microsoft Kinect), which provide depth along with color information, the task of propagating 2D knowledge into 3D becomes more attainable and enables interaction between a machine (e.g. robot) and its environment. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of indoor 3D scene understanding: (1) 2D-driven 3D object detection for single frame scenes with inherent 2D information, (2) 3D object instance segmentation for 3D reconstructed scenes, and (3) using room and floor orientation for automatic labeling of indoor scenes that could be used for self-supervised object segmentation. These methods allow capturing of physical extents of 3D objects, such as their sizes and actual locations within a scene.
Prof. Baishakhi Mazumder, Department of Materials Design and Innovation, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University at Buffalo
Friday, May 22, 2020, 16:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96245540544
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No summary is available.
Prof. Jing Zhang, Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology
Friday, May 15, 2020, 21:00
- 22:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/93387531521
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Dr. Jing Zhang is currently the Kate Gleason Endowed Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. She obtained B.S. degree in Electronic Science and Technology from Huazhong University of Science and Technology (2009), and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Lehigh University (2013). Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on developing highly efficient III-Nitride and GaO semiconductor based photonic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices. Her research group is working on the development of novel quantum well active regions and substrates for enabling high-performance ultraviolet and visible LEDs/ lasers, as well as engineering of advanced device concepts for nanoelectronics.
Monday, May 04, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96184235853
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In my talk, I will present techniques that allow biologists to model a mesocale entity in a rapid way in the timeframe of a few minutes to hours. This way we have created the first complete atomistic model of the SARS-CoV-2 virion that we are these days sharing with the worldwide scientific community. Mesoscale represents a scalar gap that is currently not possible to accurately image with neither microscopy nor X-ray crystallography approaches. For this purpose, scientists characterize it by observations from the surrounding nanoscale and the microscale. From this information, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional model of a biological entity with a full atomistic model. The problem is that these models are enormously large and are not possible to model with traditional methods from computer graphics within a reasonable time.
Sunday, May 03, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/93520008789
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This talk aims to 1) provide an envisioned picture of 6G, 2) serve as a research guideline in the beyond 5G era, and 3) go over the recently proposed solutions to provide high-speed connectivity in under-covered areas to serve and contribute to the development of far-flung regions. The role of Internet and Communication Technology (ICT) in bringing about a revolution in almost all aspects of human life needs no introduction. It is indeed a well-known fact that the transmission of the information at a rapid pace has transformed all spheres of human life such as economy, education, and health to name a few. In this context, and as the standardization of the fifth generation (5G) of wireless communication systems (WCSs) has been completed, and 5G networks are in their early stage of deployment, the research visioning and planning of the sixth generation (6G) of WCSs are being initiated. 6G is expected to be the next focus in wireless communication and networking and aim to provide new superior communication services to meet the future hyper-connectivity demands in the 2030s.
Prof. Jae-Hyun Ryou, Mechanical Engineering, Texas Center for Superconducitity
Friday, May 01, 2020, 16:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/94419715768
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Thursday, April 30, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/706745599
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In many problems in statistical signal processing, regularization is employed to deal with uncertainty, ill-posedness, and insufficiency of training data. It is possible to tune these regularizers optimally asymptotically, i.e. when the dimension of the problem becomes very large, by using tools from random matrix theory and Gauss Process Theory. In this talk, we demonstrate the optimal turning of regularization for three problems : i) Regularized least squares for solving ill-posed and/or uncertain linear systems, 2) Regularized least squares for signal detection in multiple antenna communication systems and 3) Regularized linear and quadratic discriminant binary classifiers.
Monday, April 27, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96184235853
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In this talk, we will discuss a new way of computing with quad meshes. It is based on the checkerboard pattern of parallelograms one obtains by subdividing a quad mesh at its edge midpoints. The new approach is easy to understand and implement. It simplifies the transfer from the familiar theory of smooth surfaces to the discrete setting of quad meshes. This is illustrated with applications to constrained editing of 3D models, mesh design for architecture and digital modeling of shapes which can be fabricated by bending flat pieces of inextensible sheet material.
Sunday, April 26, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/99946379374
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This talk presents an overview of challenges, state-of the-art, and applications for distributed robotic systems. In distributed robotic systems, there is a group of robots that seek to achieve a collective task. Applications include environmental monitoring, search and rescue, and programmable self-assembly. Settings can range from a small team of cooperative robots to a swarm of many interacting agents. An essential feature of such systems is that individual robots make decisions based on available local information as well as limited communications with other robots. The challenge is to design local protocols that result in desired global outcomes. In contrast to a traditional centralized paradigm, both measurements and decisions are distributed among multiple actors.
Monday, April 20, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/752168199
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In this talk, I will present the potential of nano-islands grown by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) in addition to novel material combinations in scaled memory devices. Moreover, in order to relax the scalability requirement, I will introduce an integrated potential single device solution by infusing memory device which can monitor and remember our actions and the surrounding environment. Such a device performs the roles of both a MEMory and a senSOR at once and is referred to as a MEMSOR. The MEMSOR is directly programmed by external physical stimuli rather than an applied electric potential as in conventional devices. As a result, the MEMSOR leads to faster data analysis, lower footprint area, energy consumption, and ideally, the cost of the system. Finally, the MEMSOR device will be based on a MOSFET architecture with a mature manufacturing process, and thus it can be integrated with conventional Flash devices on the same silicon wafer with minimal additional process steps.
Monday, April 20, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96184235853
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In the lecture, we present a three-dimensional model for the simulation of signal processing in neurons. Part of this approach is a method to reconstruct the geometric structure of neurons from data measured by 2-photon microscopy. Being able to reconstruct neural geometries and network connectivities from measured data is the basis of understanding coding of motoric perceptions and long term plasticity which is one of the main topics of neuroscience. Other issues are compartment models and upscaling.
Sunday, April 19, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96795520423
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Recently, wireless power transfer has been used in mobile phones, electric vehicles, medical implants, wireless sensor networks, unmanned aerial vehicles, and so on. In this seminar, we will walk through circuit theory and simulations that illustrate the nature and constraints of the technology. We will also address contemporary topics related to application of wireless power transfer in electric vehicle applications.
Thursday, April 16, 2020, 16:00
- 17:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/587532499
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The first part of this talk provides a brief introduction of the EMPC (motivation, challenges, and solutions). The second part of this talk proposes a regret-based robust EMPC paradigm for nonlinear systems subject to unknown but bounded disturbance. The main motivation of the proposed work is the possible improvement of the economic performance when one considers the regret function as the objective function for the robust EMPC algorithm instead of the worst cost. The third part of this talk introduces an integrated framework that combines a Neural Network (NN) algorithm with an MPC scheme that can guarantee closed-loop stability in the presence of deception cyberattacks (e.g., min-max cyberattack). Both discrete-time and continuous-time nonlinear systems will be utilized throughout the talk to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed control methods. Finally, future research directions will be presented at the end of the talk.
Thursday, April 16, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/706745599
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Transcription factors are an important family of proteins that control the transcription rate from DNAs to messenger RNAs through the binding to specific DNA sequences. Transcription factor regulation is thus fundamental to understanding not only the system-level behaviors of gene regulatory networks, but also the molecular mechanisms underpinning endogenous gene regulation. In this talk, I will introduce our efforts on developing novel optimization and deep learning methods to quantitatively understanding transcription factor regulation at network- and molecular-levels. Specifically, I will talk about how we estimate the kinetic parameters from sparse time-series readout of gene circuit models, and how we model the relationship between the transcription factor binding sites and their binding affinities.
Monday, April 13, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/625071673
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Dynamic programming is an efficient technique to solve optimization problems. It is based on decomposing the initial problem into simpler ones and solving these sub-problems beginning from the simplest ones. A conventional dynamic programming algorithm returns an optimal object from a given set of objects. We developed extensions of dynamic programming which allow us (i) to describe the set of objects under consideration, (ii) to perform a multi-stage optimization of objects relative to different criteria, (iii) to count the number of optimal objects,(iv) to find the set of Pareto optimal points for the bi-criteria optimization problem, and (v) to study the relationships between two criteria.
Sunday, April 12, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/721586550
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The goal of our research is to understand the physical origin of these behaviors and trasform them into sustainable technologies that tackle contemporary problem of global interest, ranging from energy harvesting to clean water production, design of smart materials, biomedical applications, information security, artificial intelligence, global warming, and so on. Creating technologies from complex natural systems is a modern interdisciplinary research field that permeates many different scientific areas, ranging from physics to mathematics, to engineering and the theory of linguistics. This is a very challenging, yet very promising research. It involves the understanding of what we consider complex, which translates as something “involved, intricate, complicated, not easily understood or analyzed”. This sets the challenge of being able to understand the mechanisms of these systems and cross many different disciplines in order to constructively harness their properties into reproducible applications.
Thursday, April 09, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/706745599
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An important stream of research in computational design aims at digital tools which support users in realizing their design intent in a simple and intuitive way, while simultaneously taking care of key aspects of function and fabrication. Such tools are expected to shorten the product development cycle through a reduction of costly feedback loops between design, engineering and fabrication. The strong coupling between shape generation, function and fabrication is a rich source for the development of new geometric concepts, with an impact to the original applications as well as to geometric theory. This will be illustrated at hand of applications in architecture and fabrication with a mathematical focus on discrete differential geometry and geometric optimization problems.
Monday, April 06, 2020, 19:30
- 21:30
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/858990591
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We developed and expanded novel methods for representation learning, predicting protein functions and their loss of function phenotypes. We use deep neural network algorithm and combine them with symbolic inference into neural-symbolic algorithms. Our work significantly improves previously developed methods for predicting protein functions through methodological advances in machine learning, incorporation of broader data types that may be predictive of functions, and improved systems for neural-symbolic integration. The methods we developed are generic and can be applied to other domains in which similar types of structured and unstructured information exist. In future, our methods can be applied to prediction of protein function for metagenomic samples in order to evaluate the potential for discovery of novel proteins of industrial value.  Also our methods can be applied to the prediction of loss of function phenotypes in human genetics and incorporate the results in a variant prioritization tool that can be applied to diagnose patients with Mendelian disorders.
Monday, April 06, 2020, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/3520039297
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The thesis focuses on the computation of high-dimensional multivariate normal (MVN) and multivariate Student-t (MVT) probabilities. Firstly, a generalization of the conditioning method for MVN probabilities is proposed and combined with the hierarchical matrix representation. Next, I revisit the Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) method and improve the state-of-the-art QMC method for MVN probabilities with block reordering, resulting in a ten-time-speed improvement. The thesis proceeds to discuss a novel matrix compression scheme using Kronecker products. This novel matrix compression method has a memory footprint smaller than the hierarchical matrices by more than one order of magnitude. A Cholesky factorization algorithm is correspondingly designed and shown to accomplish the factorization in 1 million dimensions within 600 seconds. To make the computational methods for MVN probabilities more accessible, I introduce an R package that implements the methods developed in this thesis and show that the package is currently the most scalable package for computing MVN probabilities in R. Finally, as an application, I derive the posterior properties of the probit Gaussian random field and show that the R package I introduce makes the model selection and posterior prediction feasible in high dimensions.
Monday, April 06, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/293175422
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In this seminar, I will present some of the work I have done on Continual Deep Learning, among the research topics at the Vision-CAIR group. Continual learning aims to learn new tasks without forgetting previously learned ones. This is especially challenging when one cannot access data from previous tasks and when the model has a fixed capacity as adopted in modern deep learning techniques.  Decreasing the gap towards human-level continual learning, we extended continual deep learning from multiple perspectives. The Hebb's learning theory from biology can be famously summarized as “Cells that fire together wire together.". Inspired by this theory from biology, we proposed Memory Aware Synapses (ECCV18) to quantify and reduce machine forgetting in a way that enables leveraging unlabeled data, which was not possible in former techniques. We later developed a Bayesian approach appearing at ICLR2020, where we explicitly modeled uncertainty parameters to orchestrates forgetting in continual learning. We showed in our ICLR2019 and ACCV18 works that task descriptors/ language can operate in continual learning visual tasks to improve learning efficiency and enable zero-shot task transfer. Beyond computer vision tasks, we recently developed an approach appearing at ICLR2020 we call "Compositional Language Continual Learning". We showed that disentangling syntax from semantics enables better compositional Seq2Seq learning and can significantly alleviate forgetting of tasks like machine translation.  In the talk, I will go over these techniques and shed some light on future research possibilities.
Sunday, April 05, 2020, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/590523441
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In this seminar, the science of MOCVD, the material science of InGaN, and the new-born InGaN-based red LED performance will be discussed. The three primary colors in light are RGB. Green and blue LEDs have been realized by using InGaN active region. The current red LEDs are based on AlGaAs or InGaP as the active region. If we can realize red LEDs by InGaN, it is possible to integrate RGB LEDs in a wafer. Such RGB integration is a breakthrough to develop the next displays, so-called, micro-LED displays that are the next after the OLED displays, and functional LED lightings.
Thursday, April 02, 2020, 16:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/4396782350
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This dissertation is devoted to the fabrication and electrical and optical characterization of a new class of III-nitride light-emitter known as superluminescent diode (SLD). SLD works in an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) regime, and it combines several advantages from both LD and LED, such as droop-free, speckle-free, low-spatial coherence, broader emission, high-optical power, and directional beam. Here, SLDs were fabricated by a focused ion beam by tilting the front facet of the waveguide to suppress the lasing mode. They showed a high-power of 474 mW on c-plane GaN-substrate with a large spectral bandwidth of 6.5 nm at an optical power of 105 mW. To generate SLD-based white light, a YAG-phosphor-plate was integrated, and a CRI of 85.1 and CCT of 3392 K were measured. For the VLC link, SLD showed record high-data rates of 1.45 Gbps and 3.4 Gbps by OOK and DMT modulation schemes, respectively. Additionally, a widely single- and dual-wavelength tunability were designed using SLD-based external cavity (SLD-EC) configuration for a tunable blue laser source.