Internship Participants
Wednesday, July 31, 11:00
- 13:00
Campus Library
We invite all members of the community to visit the first ever E-poster competition at KAUST for the SSI. The Saudi Summer Internship (SSI) is currently in it’s 7th year. This year CEMSE welcomes over 40 undergraduate students from Saudi Arabia to KAUST. With 25 interns being female, and 12 universities represented, 2019 is the largest and most diverse cohort of the SSI that the division has welcomed since it’s inception. All students have an excellent academic record in their home institution in areas related to Computer Science, Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. The students undertake a 12 week research program, supplemented with graduate skills and academic courses and are mentored by faculty and researchers in the CEMSE Division.
Photonics Summer Camp Participants
Tuesday, July 30, 08:30
- 11:00
Between buildings 4 and 5, The Spine
International Students in CEMSE who attended Photonics Summer Camp 2019, will present their research findings and experience of KAUST, in 10 minute presentations. Breakfast will be served. All KAUST affiliates are welcome to attend. The Photonics Summer Camp is an international internship program, currently in it’s 4th year. The program is just 4 weeks long and is designed to welcome overseas and local students to KAUST, in order to facilitate research innovation and collaboration amongst the next generation of photonics researchers. The program is sponsored by the CEMSE Division, with support from Graduate Affairs, and the International Programs Office.
Dr. Rosa Badia Sala, Workflows and Distributed Computing Group Manager, Barcelona Supercomputing Center
Tuesday, July 16, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Hall 1, Room 2322
Current computing infrastructures are evolving from traditional systems to environments that involve sensors, edge devices, instruments, and high-end  computing power in the cloud and HPC systems. A key aspect is how to describe the applications to be executed in such platforms. Very often these applications are not standalone, but involve a set of sub-applications or steps composing a workflow. The scientists then rely on effective environments to describe their workflows and engines to manage them in complex infrastructures. Refreshments - Brown Bag Lunch will be served.
Dr. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor, Advanced Materials, Wiley
Tuesday, July 09, 14:00
- 15:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
Materials science is a multidisciplinary field of research with many different scientists and engineers having various backgrounds active in it. The literature landscape consequently is populated currently by a wide range of journals which greatly differ in purpose, scope, quality, and readership. Jos Lenders, Deputy Editor of Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional Materials, and Advanced Optical Materials, will track some of the most important developments and trends in the research field and the Advanced journals program. Last year, Advanced Materials reached an Impact Factor of 21.95 and received over 8,300 submissions – and Advanced Functional Materials over 9,200. Only around 15% of all those papers made it to publication in the journal, and this rate is similar for all other Advanced journals. So, what do editors do to select the very best papers, and what can authors do to optimize their chances of having their manuscripts accepted?
Dr. Mehdi Bennis, Associate Professor, Centre for Wireless Communications, University of Oulu
Monday, July 08, 11:00
- 12:00
B 1, L 3, Room 3119
In just a few years, breakthroughs in machine learning (ML) and particularly deep learning have transformed every aspects of our lives from face recognition, medical diagnosis, and natural language processing. This progress has been fueled mainly by the availability of more data and more computing power. However, the current premise in classical ML is based on a single node in a centralized and remote data center with full access to a global dataset and a massive amount of storage and computing, sifting through this data for inference.
Monday, July 08, 08:30
- 10:30
Building 1, Level 2, Room 2202
The demand for wireless communication is ceaselessly increasing in terms of the number of subscribers and services. Future generations of cellular networks are expected to allow not only humans but also machines to be immersively connected. However, the radio frequency spectrum is already fully allocated. Therefore, developing techniques to increase spectrum efficiency has become necessary. In that context, this dissertation analyzes two spectrum sharing techniques that enable efficient utilization of the available radio resources in cellular networks. The first technique, called full-duplex (FD) communication, uses the same spectrum to transmit and receive simultaneously. The second spectrum sharing technique, called non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA), allows a transmitter to communicate with multiple receivers through the same frequency-time resource unit.
Dr. Romain Murenzi, Executive Director, The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS)
Wednesday, July 03, 12:00
- 13:30
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
It is an accepted fact that science, technology, and innovation are central to addressing global challenges facing humanity, such as climate change, energy security, food security, diseases, clean water, population control, conflicts and poverty. Therefore, nations are adopting policies and strategies for advancing science, technology and innovation as tools for sustainable economic growth, poverty alleviation and environmental protection. In this talk, I will discuss the role of TWAS working with developing countries in building their science capacity, with special attention to the 47 Least Developed Countries and Africa. TWAS initiatives such as South-South fellowships, research grants, exchange programs and science diplomacy will be discussed.
Prof. Liching Chiu, Graduate Program of Teaching Chinese as a Second Language (TCSL), National Taiwan University
Tuesday, July 02, 10:00
- 11:00
B3 L5 Room 5209
This series of lectures guide students to the preparation and analysis of a well-organized abstract. We will discuss the proper language (tense, voice, and person) for abstract writing, and learn how to meet the purposes of different abstracts. Finally, students will have a chance to compose and evaluate their writing. Topics: Overview of abstract writing; Conference abstract journal abstract; Organization of an abstract; Language conventions of abstract writing; Disciplinary abstract analysis; Frequent mistakes of abstract writing.
Dr. Faissal El Bouanani, Chair of CommNet and ACOSIS conferences
Monday, July 01, 11:00
- 12:00
B1, L2, R2202

Abstract

In the last decade, with the emergence of the internet of things (IoT) as well as machine-to-machine (M2M) paradigms,

Prof. Alfred Hero, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan
Tuesday, June 25, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214
The objective of benchmark learning is to use a training sample to learn about fundamental limits on performance of a classifier or other statistical inference procedure. This meta-learning problem is a crucial component of data science and interpretable AI. Examples include sequential design of experiments, reinforcement learning and sensor management in the fields of statistics, machine learning and systems engineering, respectively. The challenge is learn about best achievable accuracy directly from the data sample without having to approximate and mplement an optimal classifier algorithm. In this talk we will introduce a general information theoretic framework that yields benchmark learners having both linear computational complexity and linear sample complexity. We will illustrate how this framework in the context of benchmarking image classification, autonomous navigation, and deep neural network performance.
Prof. Yonghui Li, Director of Wireless Engineering Laboratory, The University of Sydney
Monday, June 24, 16:30
- 17:30
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
Connected smart objects, platforms and environments have been identified as the next big technology development, enabling significant society changes and economic growth. The entire physical world will be connected to the Internet. The intelligent network for automatic interaction and processing between objects and environments, referred to as the Machine to Machine Communications (M2M) for Internet of Things (IoT), will become an inherent part of areas such as electricity, transportation, industrial control, utilities management, healthcare, water resources management and mining. Wireless networks are one of the key enabling technologies of the IoT. They are likely to be universally used for last mile connectivity due to their flexibility, scalability and cost effectiveness.
Monday, June 24, 12:00
- 14:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is a key enabling technology to achieve the required spectral and energy efficiency of the next generation of wireless networks. By endowing the base station (BS) with hundreds of antennas and relying on spatial multiplexing, massive MIMO allows impressive advantages in many fronts. To reduce this promising technology to reality, thorough performance analysis has to be conducted. Along this line, this work is focused on the convenient high-dimensionality of massive MIMO’s corresponding model. Indeed, the large number of antennas allows us to harness asymptotic results from Random Matrix Theory to provide accurate approximations of the main performance metrics. The derivations yield simple closed-form expressions that can be easily interpreted and manipulated in contrast to their alternative random equivalents. Accordingly, in this dissertation, we investigate massive MIMO in different contexts.
Monday, June 24, 09:00
- 10:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4214
Random matrix theory is an outstanding mathematical tool that has demonstrated its usefulness in many areas ranging from wireless communication to finance and economics. The main motivation behind its use comes from the fundamental role that random matrices play in modeling unknown and unpredictable physical quantities. In many situations, meaningful metrics expressed as scalar functionals of these random matrices arise naturally. Along this line, the present work consists in leveraging tools from random matrix theory in an attempt to answer fundamental questions related to applications from statistical signal processing and machine learning.
Prof. Liang Feng, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania
Thursday, May 30, 10:00
- 11:00
B1 L2 Room 4214
Quantum mechanics and photonics share mathematical equivalence. By carefully exploiting the interplay between optical index, gain and loss in the complex dielectric permittivity plane, optics has become an ideal platform to explore some exotic quantum concepts, such as topological physics and parity-time (PT) symmetry. Instead of counteracting optical losses at micro and nano scales in integrated photonics, we started from an opposite viewpoint and developed a new paradigm of positively and strategically manipulating optical losses by the quantum-inspired photonics concept enrich fundamental optical physics and realized novel photonic synthetic matters with unique optical functionalities. In this seminar, I will present our recent efforts on engineering the complex optical potentials at an exceptional point (i.e. PT symmetry transition point). Based on the exceptional point-induced unidirectionality, we harness optical losses to enable unique microlaser functionalities, in particular, an orbital angular momentum (OAM) microlaser that structures and twists the lasing radiation at the microscale, which is expected to address the growing demand for information capacity. Additionally, I will discuss non-Hermitian topological photonics where optical non-Hermiticity and topological physics are coupled.
Professor Ritesh Agarwal, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania
Thursday, May 30, 09:00
- 10:00
B1 L2 Room 4214
Strongly confined electrical, optical and thermal excitations drastically modify material’s properties and break local symmetries that can enable precisely tunable novel responses and new functionalities. We will discuss the effect of engineered plasmonic lattice on light matter interactions in 2D excitonic crystals to produce novel responses such as enhanced and tunable emission, Fano resonances and strong exciton-plasmon polaritons, which can be precisely controlled by geometry and applied fields to produce novel device concepts. Our recent work on collective polaritonic modes and the formation of a complete polaritonic bandgap in few-layered excitonic semiconductors coupled to plasmons will also be presented.
Prof. Nicola Fusco, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Wednesday, May 29, 15:30
- 17:00
B1 L4 room 4102
The aim of the course is to give a self contained introduction, at the level of a graduate course, to the stability of the isoperimetric inequality and other related geometric and functional inequality such as the Sobolev inequality, the Faber-Krahn and the Brunn-Minkowski inequality.  Lecture 4: I will discuss the quantitative isoperimetric inequality in the general case and the quantitative form of related geometric and functional inequalities.
Tong Zhang, Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics, HKUST
Wednesday, May 29, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Hall 1
Many problems in machine learning rely on statistics and optimization. To solve these problems, new techniques are needed. I will show some of these new techniques through selected machine learning problems I have recently worked on, such as nonconvex stochastic optimization, distributed training, adversarial attack, and generative models.
Tuesday, May 28, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 2, Level 5, Room 5220
Mean-field games MFG are models of large populations of rational agents who seek to optimize an objective function that takes into account their state variables and the distribution of the state variable of the remaining agents. MFG with congestion model problems where the agents’ motion is hampered in high-density regions. First, we study radial solutions for first- and second-order stationary MFG with congestion on R^d. Next, we consider second-order stationary MFG with congestion and prove the existence of stationary solutions. Additionally, we study first-order stationary MFG with congestion with quadratic or power-like Hamiltonians.
Prof. Nicola Fusco, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Monday, May 27, 14:30
- 16:00
B1 L4 room 4102
The aim of the course is to give a self contained introduction, at the level of a graduate course, to the stability of the isoperimetric inequality and other related geometric and functional inequality such as the Sobolev inequality, the Faber-Krahn and the Brunn-Minkowski inequality.  Lecture 3: I will present Fuglede’s proof of the quantitative isoperimetric inequality for convex and for nearly spherical sets
Monday, May 27, 10:00
- 11:00
B2 L5 Room 5220
The design of laser-based optical sensors relies heavily on precise spectroscopic knowledge of atomic and molecular absorption transitions. Accurate spectroscopic information is invaluable in several fields such as biology, chemistry, astronomy, and environmental science. Within the electromagnetic spectrum, the mid-infrared (MIR) region can enable sensors with higher sensitivity due to the stronger absorption cross-sections. Moreover, MIR spectral transitions correspond to the fundamental vibrational motions of the molecules and are thus considered fingerprints of the molecular structure. Vibrational bands contain many rotational transitions, resulting in fine-splitting of spectral bands, particularly in gaseous samples. In order to resolve the fine rotational structure of vibrational bands, high-resolution MIR spectrometers are needed.
Prof. Daniel Costa , Federal University of Ceará
Sunday, May 26, 14:00
- 15:00
B1, L2, R2202
Non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) has recently emerged not only as a new design of multiple access techniques in cellular networks, but also as a general principle of network architecture for applications beyond cellular systems. This talk will present and discuss the fundamentals of NOMA, and examine how it can be combined with other emerging communication technologies. Some new research trends and challenges will also be discussed.
Prof. Nicola Fusco, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy
Wednesday, May 22, 14:30
- 16:00
B1 L4 room 4102
The aim of the course is to give a self contained introduction, at the level of a graduate course, to the stability of the isoperimetric inequality and other related geometric and functional inequality such as the Sobolev inequality, the Faber-Krahn and the Brunn-Minkowski inequality. Lecture 2: I will present De Giorgi’s proof of the isoperimetric inequality and comment on other proofs of the isoperimetric inequality
Jason E. Roos, Chief Information Officer, KAUST
Wednesday, May 22, 08:30
- 09:30
Building 9, Hall 2
“KAUST Smart” is a newly launched program intended to facilitate the design and implementation of digital experiences that will be developed in partnership with leading technology companies and the tremendous talent of KAUST.  These unique solutions will be piloted and tested utilizing the KAUST community as a living laboratory and showcased to the rest of the world as an example of how KAUST is a global innovation leader.
Prof. Rolf Krause, Faculty of Informatics, Università della Svizzera Italiana, Lugano
Tuesday, May 21, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Hall 2
Complex geometries, non-smooth surface-effects, non-linear and heterogeneous material behaviour, and coupled multi-physics problems pose fundamental challenges for numerical simulation methods - may it be on the mathematical or on the software sie. In this talk, we will present and discuss multi-scale approaches for the efficient  solution  of smooth and non-smooth  large scale non-linear systems, and we will comment on how to realize them in modern and HPC-friendly scientific software. Particular emphasis will be put on the design and construction of non-standard  approximation and model hierarchies for  non-linear problems, which then will be exploited for designing efficient solution methods in space, time, and space-time.