Monday, March 23, 2020, 07:00
- 23:00
KAUST
The aim of this conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners in the interdisciplinary field of biodevices, which spans across electronics, medicine, engineering, material sciences, and related areas.  The conference is a continuation of a series that started this year with the KAUST Research Conference on New Trends in Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
Monday, November 18, 2019, 00:00
- 23:45
Auditorium 0215, between building 2 and 3
2019 Statistics and Data Science Workshop confirmed speakers include Prof. Alexander Aue, University of California Davis, USA, Prof. Francois Bachoc, University Toulouse 3, France, Prof. Rosa M. Crujeiras Casais, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, Prof. Emanuele Giorgi, Lancaster University, UK, Prof. Jeremy Heng, ESSEC Asia-Pacific, Singapore, Prof. Birgir Hrafnkelsson, University of Iceland, Iceland, Prof. Ajay Jasra, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Emtiyaz Khan, RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project, Japan, Prof. Robert Krafty, University of Pittsburgh, USA, Prof. Guido Kuersteiner, University of Maryland, USA, Prof. Paula Moraga, University of Bath, UK, Prof. Tadeusz Patzek, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Prof. Brian Reich, North Carolina State University, USA, Prof. Dag Tjostheim, University Bergen, Norway, Prof. Xiangliang Zhang, KAUST, Saudi Arabia, Sylvia Rose Esterby, University of British Colombia, Canada, Prof. Abdel El-Shaarawi, Retired Professor at the National Water Research Institute, Canada.
Dr. Timo Ropinski, Professor, Visual Computing, Ulm University, Germany
Monday, October 07, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322

Abstract

In this talk, I will present our recent advances in deep learnin

Dr. Yunhai Wang, Professor, Computer SciemShandong University, China
Wednesday, October 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322

Abstract

By providing visual representations of data, visualization can h

Dr. Marc Dacier, Chair of the Digital Security department and a full Professor at Eurecom, France
Monday, September 30, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322

Abstract

It is well known that malware spreading over the Internet aim at

Thursday, September 26, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Extreme environmental events such as droughts, floods and heat-waves take place in space and time, and it is necessary to take this into account when evaluating their risks and estimating their probabilities.  During this seminar, I will review some classical and more recent work on this topic, focusing on the modeling of univariate and spatial extremes. The ideas will be illustrated by applications to peak river flow data from the UK, and heavy rainfall close to Jeddah.
Dr. Ciril Bohak, Postdoctoral Researcher, Faculty of Computer and Information Science, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Wednesday, September 25, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
Building 1, Level 2, VCC Lecture Room

Abstract

Our ongoing research on the reconstruction of aerial point cloud

Dr. Suhaib Fahmy, Associate Professor, Computer Engineering, University of Warwick, UK
Tuesday, September 24, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Auditorium 0215 (between Buildings 2 & 3)

Abstract

With increasing connectivity and reliance on machine intelligenc

Dr. Paul Anthony Haigh,Lecturer in Communications, Intelligent Sensing and Communications Group,Newcastle University
Tuesday, September 17, 2019, 13:00
- 14:00
B2 L5 Room 5220

Abstract

Visible light communications (VLC) is a hot topic in internet access networks, developing rapidly over the last decade

Sunday, September 15, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1, Room 2322
Wave functional materials are artificial materials that can control wave propagation as wished. In this talk, I will give a brief review of the progress of wave functional materials and reveal the secret behind the engineering of these materials to achieve desired properties.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Lecture Hall 1
We focus on the theoretical modeling and numerical simulation of classical wave propagation in complex systems, such as periodic structures and random media.  In this talk, I will give an overview of the research conducted in our group by emphasizing on three major aspects:  numerical method, homogenization, and applications in artificial materials.
Thursday, September 12, 2019, 09:30
- 11:00
Building 3, Level 5, Room 5209
This thesis aims to investigate the microscopic characteristics of the nanowires and expand on the possibility of using transparent amorphous substrate for III-nitride nanowire devices. In this work, we performed material growth, characterization, and device fabrication of III-nitride nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy on unconventional substrates including silicon substrates and fused silica substrates. We also investigated the effect of various nucleation layers on the morphology and quality of the nanowires.
Dr. Xiuxian Li, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Monday, September 09, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
This talk is concerned with the problem of seeking a common fixed point for a finite collection of nonexpansive operators over time-varying multi-agent networks in real Hilbert spaces. Each operator is assumed to be only privately and approximately known to each individual agent, and all agents need to cooperate to solve this problem by local communications over time-varying networks. To handle this problem, inspired by the centralized inexact Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (IKM) iteration, two distributed algorithms, called distributed inexact Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (D-IKM) iteration and distributed inexact block-coordinate Krasnosel’ski˘ı-Mann (D-IBKM) iteration, are proposed. It is shown that the two algorithms can converge weakly to a common fixed point of the family of nonexpansive operators.
Sunday, September 08, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322
This talk provides an overview of the latest laser-based lighting and Gbit/s VLC and underwater communications. Recent progress of visible wavelength high-speed transmitters and receivers will also be discussed.
Christian Claudel, Assistant Professor, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at UT-Austin
Wednesday, September 04, 2019, 10:00
- 11:00
Building 5, Level 5, Room 5209

Abstract

Flash floods are one of the most common natural disasters worldwide, causing thousands of casualties every year.

Monday, September 02, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
In this talk, I will first give an overview of the research activities in Structural and Functional Bioinformatics Group (http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa). I will then focus on our efforts on developing computational methods to tackle key open problems in Nanopore sequencing. In particular, I will introduce our recent works on developing a collection of computational methods to decode raw electrical current signal sequences into DNA sequences, to simulate raw signals of Nanopore, and to efficiently and accurately align electrical current signal sequences with DNA sequences. Then, I will further introduce their applications in clinical and environmental fields.
Sunday, September 01, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
With the advent of wearable sensors and internet of things (IoT), there is a new focus on electronics which can be bent so that they can be worn or mounted on non-planar objects. Due to large volume (billions of devices), there is a requirement that the cost is extremely low, to the extent that they become disposable. The flexible and low-cost aspects can be addressed through additive manufacturing technologies such as inkjet, screen and 3D printing. This talk introduces additive manufacturing as an emerging technique to realize low cost, flexible and wearable wireless communication and sensing systems.
Professor Rajesh Rajamani, Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota
Sunday, September 01, 2019, 11:00
- 12:00
Building 1, Level 2, Room 4214
A number of exciting vehicle automation and active safety systems are being developed by research groups around the world.  This talk focuses on novel sensors, estimation algorithms and control systems that can fill critical gaps in the automation technologies under development. The first part of this seminar describes interesting sensing and estimation solutions that can significantly improve the effectiveness of active safety systems. The second part of the seminar describes the development of a new class of narrow commuter vehicles designed to address traffic congestion, improve highway mobility and provide very high fuel economy. The final part of the seminar describes the development of a smart bicycle with instrumentation that can track trajectories of nearby vehicles on the road and provide warnings to the motorist, if a potential car-bicycle collision is detected.
Monday, August 26, 2019, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Hall 1
The life sciences have invested significant resources in the development and application of semantic technologies to make research data accessible and interlinked, and to enable the integration and analysis of data. Utilizing the semantics associated with research data in data analysis approaches is often challenging. Now, novel methods are becoming available that combine symbolic methods and statistical methods in Artificial Intelligence. In my talk, I will describe how to apply knowledge-based methods for the analysis of biological and biomedical data, in particular identification of gene-disease associations and drug targets.