Prof. Simos G. Meintanis, Department of Economics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and Extraordinary Professor with North-West University, South Africa
Sunday, May 29, 2022, 15:30
- 16:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
We investigate privacy aspects of tests for symmetry equivalence null hypotheses. Specifically we consider weighted L2--type tests as well as chi-squared type tests for multivariate symmetry based on the characteristic function, and their privacy properties are specifically quantified within the context of differential privacy. We consider both the case of known centre as well as tests for symmetry about an unknown centre.
Prof. Giuseppe Bianchi, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy
Sunday, May 29, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Lecture Hall, Room 2325
Contact Person
In the last decade, the networking research community has significantly fueled the network softwarization and virtualization trend. Network processing tasks, originally performed by dedicated hardware appliances, were converted into software components running on commodity hardware, and deployed in relevant cloud infrastructures (central and/or edge).
Prof. Hailiang Liu, Department of Mathematics, Iowa State University, USA
Wednesday, May 25, 2022, 15:00
- 16:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102, https://kaust.zoom.us/j/96443244183
Contact Person
I shall present some mathematical problems encountered in deep learning models. The results include optimal control of selection dynamics for deep neural networks, and gradient methods adaptive with energy. Some of the computational questions that will be addressed have a more general interest in engineering and sciences.
Prof. Yvon Henri, International Telecom Union, Geneva, Switzerland
Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 16:00
- 18:00
https:/kaust.zoom.us/j/91224858133
Contact Person
Noting that the trend of development and utilization of small satellite technologies is a global phenomenon, and it is expected to bring benefits to the entire world, including both developed and developing economies, this talk goes over different spectrum & orbit access issues related to the development and deployment of these small satellite networks.
Prof. Takashi Gojobori, Computational Bioscience Research Center, KAUST
Tuesday, May 24, 2022, 12:00
- 14:00
Building 19, Hall 3
Contact Person
The Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC) will be holding a student poster competition as part of its yearly conference. Core Labs booths will also be featured in this session.
Prof. Takashi Gojobori, Computational Bioscience Research Center, KAUST
Monday, May 23, 2022, 08:00
- 16:30
Building 19, Hall 1
Contact Person
The Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC) is pleased to invite the KAUST community to the KAUST Research Conference on Advances in Metagenomics and its Applications.
Peter Rawlinson, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Technology Officer of Lucid
Thursday, May 19, 2022, 14:30
- 15:30
Building 20, Level 2, Room 2011 (The Rehearsal Room)
Contact Person
In this wide-ranging conversation with Peter Rawlinson, Lucid Motors’ CEO and CTO, he will discuss why he believes the world is on the precipice of a global transition toward electric vehicles, and how Lucid’s revolutionary technology and design will be at the forefront of one of the most significant transformations of our time.
Monday, May 16, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Room 2322, Hall 1
Contact Person
Datasets that capture the connection between vision, language, and affection are limited, causing a lack of understanding of the emotional aspect of human intelligence. As a step in this direction, the ArtEmis dataset was recently introduced as a large-scale dataset of emotional reactions to images along with language explanations of these chosen emotions.
Prof. Moncef Gabbouj, Department of Computing Sciences, Tampere University
Sunday, May 15, 2022, 14:00
- 15:00
Building 1, Level 3, Room 3119
Contact Person
Operational Neural Networks (ONNs) are new generation network models targeting to address two major drawbacks of conventional Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs): the homogenous network configuration and the “linear” neuron model that can only perform linear transformations over previous layer outputs. ONNs can perform any linear or non-linear transformation with a proper combination of “nodal” and “pool” operators.
Stochastic Numerics PI Professor Raul Tempone (Chair) and Computational Probability PI Professor Ajay Jasra (Co-Chair)
Sunday, May 15, 2022, 08:00
- 17:00
KAUST Campus
Contact Person
This scientific meeting will concentrate on stochastic algorithms and their rigorous numerical analysis for various problems, including statistical learning, optimization, and approximation. Stochastic algorithms are valuable tools when addressing challenging computational problems.
Prof. Luca Heltai, Applied Mathematics, International School for Advanced Studies
Thursday, May 12, 2022, 15:00
- 16:00
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
Real life multi-phase and multi-physics problems coupled across different scales present outstanding challenges, whose practical resolution often require unconventional numerical methods.
Prof Daniela Tonon, Department of Mathematics, University of Padova, Italy
Thursday, May 12, 2022, 14:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92447974621
Contact Person
In this course, we introduce the Boltzmann equation, i.e. the equation that describes the behavior of rarefied gases at a mesoscopic scale. This scale can be considered as in between the microscopic scale (where the gas is described as a set of a large number of particles) and the macroscopic one (where the gas is described as a continuum fluid). Starting from the classical free transport equation, we will describe the crucial role of the collisional operator that can be deduced from physical assumptions. In particular, we will focus on the formal derivation of the Boltzmann equation and on the techniques used to cope with its particular, highly singular, collisional operator, in the study of the Cauchy problem. We will conclude with the study of the Boltzmann equation in the more physically relevant case of bounded domains, considering several different boundary conditions such as in flow, specular reflection, bounce-back reflection and diffuse boundary conditions.
Prof Daniela Tonon, Department of Mathematics, University of Padova, Italy
Wednesday, May 11, 2022, 15:00
- 17:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92305928731
Contact Person
In this course, we introduce the Boltzmann equation, i.e. the equation that describes the behavior of rarefied gases at a mesoscopic scale. This scale can be considered as in between the microscopic scale (where the gas is described as a set of a large number of particles) and the macroscopic one (where the gas is described as a continuum fluid). Starting from the classical free transport equation, we will describe the crucial role of the collisional operator that can be deduced from physical assumptions. In particular, we will focus on the formal derivation of the Boltzmann equation and on the techniques used to cope with its particular, highly singular, collisional operator, in the study of the Cauchy problem. We will conclude with the study of the Boltzmann equation in the more physically relevant case of bounded domains, considering several different boundary conditions such as in flow, specular reflection, bounce-back reflection and diffuse boundary conditions.
Prof. Helen Moore, MD-Pulmonary Systems Medicine Department, University of Florida, USA
Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 17:00
- 18:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/8570786729
Contact Person
How to Use Mathematics to Predict Cancer Patient Responses to Immuno-therapy.
Prof. Daniela Tonon, Department of Mathematics, University of Padova, Italy
Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 14:00
- 16:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98424890662
Contact Person
In this course, we introduce the Boltzmann equation, i.e. the equation that describes the behavior of rarefied gases at a mesoscopic scale. This scale can be considered as in between the microscopic scale (where the gas is described as a set of a large number of particles) and the macroscopic one (where the gas is described as a continuum fluid). Starting from the classical free transport equation, we will describe the crucial role of the collisional operator that can be deduced from physical assumptions. In particular, we will focus on the formal derivation of the Boltzmann equation and on the techniques used to cope with its particular, highly singular, collisional operator, in the study of the Cauchy problem. We will conclude with the study of the Boltzmann equation in the more physically relevant case of bounded domains, considering several different boundary conditions such as in flow, specular reflection, bounce-back reflection and diffuse boundary conditions.
Michal A. Mankowski, Assistant Professor, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 10:00
- 11:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
This course aims to familiarize students with the Computer Simulation tools for complex problems. The course will introduce the basic concepts of computation through modeling and simulation that are increasingly being used in industry and academia. The basic concepts of Discrete Event Simulation will be introduced along with the reliable methods of random variate generation. Later in the course, the concept of simulation-based optimization will be discussed, introducing an overview of various optimization approaches. The example of simulation (and optimization) applied to design an optimal organ allocation policy in the US will be discussed. The last lecture will be devoted to the contemporary topics in simulation.
Monday, May 09, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/98631999457
Contact Person
Hydrogen is a carbon-free energy carrier that can be used to decarbonize various high-emitting sectors, such as transportation, power generation, and industry. Today, global hydrogen production is largely derived from fossil fuels such as natural gas and coal.
Michal A. Mankowski, Assistant Professor, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Monday, May 09, 2022, 10:00
- 11:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
This course aims to familiarize students with the Computer Simulation tools for complex problems. The course will introduce the basic concepts of computation through modeling and simulation that are increasingly being used in industry and academia. The basic concepts of Discrete Event Simulation will be introduced along with the reliable methods of random variate generation. Later in the course, the concept of simulation-based optimization will be discussed, introducing an overview of various optimization approaches. The example of simulation (and optimization) applied to design an optimal organ allocation policy in the US will be discussed. The last lecture will be devoted to the contemporary topics in simulation.
Sunday, May 08, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2322, Lecture Hall 1
Contact Person
Since Moore's law is facing several bottlenecks, electron devices are currently developing toward the trend of “More than Moore” which is based on functional diversification in terms of sensing, storage, and processing of information.
Michal A. Mankowski, Assistant Professor, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Sunday, May 08, 2022, 10:00
- 11:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
This course aims to familiarize students with the Computer Simulation tools for complex problems. The course will introduce the basic concepts of computation through modeling and simulation that are increasingly being used in industry and academia. The basic concepts of Discrete Event Simulation will be introduced along with the reliable methods of random variate generation. Later in the course, the concept of simulation-based optimization will be discussed, introducing an overview of various optimization approaches. The example of simulation (and optimization) applied to design an optimal organ allocation policy in the US will be discussed. The last lecture will be devoted to the contemporary topics in simulation.
Prof. Raquel Prado, Department of Statistics, University of California
Thursday, April 28, 2022, 16:30
- 17:30
Auditorium 0215 (BW Building 2 and 3)
Contact Person
During the first part of the talk we present an approach that allows for flexible analysis of multivariate non-stationary time series via dynamic models on the partial autocorrelation domain. We discuss various aspects of these models, including the use of shrinkage priors to deal with overfitting issues, as well as hierarchical extensions.
Thursday, April 28, 2022, 12:00
- 13:00
Building 9, Level 2, Room 2325
Contact Person
Geometry plays an important role in the design and fabrication of so-called freeform shapes. This talk will illustrate the fruitful interplay between theory and applications in this area. The focus will be on discrete differential geometry and on applications in architecture and fabrication-aware design.
Prof. Raquel Prado, Department of Statistics, University of California
Wednesday, April 27, 2022, 16:00
- 17:30
Building 1, Level 4, Room 4102
Contact Person
In the first part of this lecture we present a review dynamic linear models for multivariate time series and hierarchical dynamic linear models for multiple time series. Topics related to model building as well as closed form, approximate and simulation-based methods for Bayesian filtering, smoothing and forecasting within these classes of models will be discussed.
Prof. David Nott, Department of Statistics and Data Science, National University of Singapore
Wednesday, April 27, 2022, 10:00
- 11:00
https://kaust.zoom.us/j/92521896552
Contact Person
Bayesian analyses combine information represented by different terms in a joint Bayesian model. When one or more of the terms is misspecified, it can be helpful to restrict the use of information from suspect model components to modify posterior inference.